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  1. Tracking an issue in my latest PCB gave me a brain tickle back to a conversation I had with Adrian Black (who famously has a Digital Basement) and Tech Man Dan Retro Tech Dan at VCFMW this past weekend. The '816 wouldn't boot on X16 due to a VERA timing sensitivity. Fixing VERA's timing issue should, in theory, correct both problems. Presenting Commander X16 booted on a W65C816S at 8MHz:
    10 points
  2. More HW savvy readers may ask the obvious question of why I needed to add capacitance to VERA when Kevin's PCB did not. The most likely answer (to me, anyway) comes from a size comparison of the two PCBs: Kevin's board is micro-ATX and mine is mini-ITX. The trace length of the address and data lines on the official board are 2.5-3 times longer than mine. Those longer wires necessarily have more stray capacitance, and one doesn't need a great deal of additional capacitance to get it working. Considering all of the wires on the official board have to cross nearly the full width of the micro ATX board *twice* and then some, it seems to make sense. The reason I had to dig down on this timing issue and not continue using a 30pF cap on A2 is that on my latest board (the green one in the first post) I tightened up my trace lengths even more and now VERA was missing A4 and occasionally A0. While pondering the exact cause and solution to the problem, my brain wandered back to the discussion I had with the other retro hardware experts Sunday evening and then had my eureka moment: the issue causing my current board to misbehave worse than the previous one and the issue preventing 65816 from working on the board had the same underlying cause: /WE deassertion wasn't seen by VERA until we were right on the edge of missing the correct bus state. After getting the board to boot from 65C02 without adding more load caps, I swapped in a 65C816 to test the theory. After removing the 30pF load cap from A2, it worked!
    8 points
  3. Frank accepted my pull request that implements a feature request from @ZeroByte in which bit 6 of AUDIO_CTRL ($9F3B) will read as 1 if the PCM FIFO is empty. The idea behind this is that if software is waiting for the FIFO to drain to reconfigure the PCM state machine for playback at a different sample rate or sample size, that software can now poll this bit to minimize latency where previously it had to be guessed at.
    7 points
  4. Late November is when I officially released Zsound. That was at the ultimate nadir of Commander X16's community enthusiasm level. Things had stalled out. R38 was a year and a half old. It had serious broken things about it. The community was having to build everything for R38 and for the potential R39 that never would seem to come to pass. Then in March, @Michael Steil started merging pull requests to the repo, and we suddenly shot up to version r41 in a matter of mere weeks. Furthermore, @Wavicle got his Breadboard16 up and running and was very involved with the community members who wanted to see their projects run on real hardware. This led to the discovery and correction of a few bugs in the VERA code, read/write timing fixes for the YM2151 (quite a finnicky chip to deal with on the bus!) and most importantly of all - spearheading the efforts to resolve the long standing problems of PS/2 and SD card stability at 4MHz / 8MHz. For once, we started making real headway! You can see how much stuff I started working on in the spring. This new synergy led to renewed excitement and progress on the parts of Kevin and Dave, and now we really are able to feel excited - like there really will be a Commander X16 on people's desktops in the not-too-distant future! Many others have been making amazing contributions to these efforts over the summer, especially @Stefan and @Jeffrey who worked tirelessly with Wavicle on getting the new PS/2 functionality ironed out in the Kernal and in the ATTiny SMC code. The code in September was me helping David get Zsound working in PETSCII Robots for a great upgrade to the X16 version's audio aspect, and then on to my latest project, Calliope. I would probably not have ended up making Calliope were it not for the reinvigoration that's taken place this year. Thanks, everyone!
    6 points
  5. Hi all, I only recently got to updating VolksForth and subsequently cc64 to the prototype #2 bank switching register and the post R38 Kernals; today I have uploaded the new versions which run with the Kernal version R41. About the Kernal version dependency: Looking back I'm of course a bit unhappy it; it came from the use of Kernal variables, which on the C64 and C16 was somewhat natural to me and the prior authors of VolksForth, but of course it's not safe with a Kernal still under development like the X16's where the variable locations can still move. I've now replaced most of the Kernal variable use with API calls, but found one case where I still can't do without directly accessing IOStatus (currently 0x0289). I've opened x16-rom issue 333 with a suggestion to address this. In the meantime, I hope the current versions work well for you Cheers /Philip
    5 points
  6. Basically, it's the definitive answer to the question "has the previous sound finished playing?" or "am I getting a buffer underflow?" (depending on whether your routine is currently in "playing" state or not) It was essentially a "free" feature that doesn't break anything by adding it, but allows more options if you want to use it, so why not, eh?
    4 points
  7. The kiosk demo at VCF Midwest was almost entirely SD-based (the kiosk code lived in the ROM, but all the demo software was loaded from the SD card). Zero read failures all weekend. Seems pretty stable.
    4 points
  8. Calliope Zsound Music Player View File This is the initial version of Calliope, a music library player for Zsound's ZSM music files. The current version of the player is complete as a simple browser/player. You can put any .ZSM files into any folder and it will let you browse to it and play them. This is the initial version, and is far from implementing all the features I want to do. However, this is not a work-in-progress mockup - it is fully functional and useful for browsing your audio assets if you're making a game, or just like listening to tunes. The download includes a collection of various music I've collected and converted into ZSM format. The folders are organized by their source - most are from VGMrips.net (Arcade folder) but since the Zsound VGM conversion tool is able to convert other chips into the Commander X16's chips' formats, you'll find many tunes from Sega Genesis or games that used the YM2202. In the future, I will be adding even more chips to the conversion tool (NES APU being the one I intend to do next). Furnace / Deflemask folders are also present with a few examples from Deflemask's demos collection, and in the Furnace folder is a collection of tunes designed NATIVELY for the Commander X16. Furnace tracker supports VERA PSG, and I've built a fork which can export these tunes to ZSM format. Some members of the Furnace discord have submitted demo tunes which are included along with .TXT files giving them credit (no meta data in ZSM for such details). The next major feature will be to create, save, and load playlists of music and leave it running with your tunes playing back on REAL HARDWARE. What could be cooler than that? The download is in the form of an SD image, as emulators do not let you change directories on the Host FS. Submitter ZeroByte Submitted 09/08/22 Category Audio Apps  
    4 points
  9. That's because the program must now be started from the command line with the switch -rtc in order for the real time clock to function and produce the data for use in TI$. (IMHO, the RTC being active should be the default state of the emulator—and I'm guessing that it probably will be, once Michael has verified that it works properly and conforms with the behavior of the real hardware.)
    4 points
  10. At long last, my PR adding Zsound's music format ZSM has been accepted and merged! This means that there is now an official version of a current tracker that you can use to make music for Commander X16 and use the music on system with Zsound. The exciting thing about this is that Furnace supports native VERA channels, so no more having to work with Sega Genesis mode in Furnace or Deflemask and export via VGM! For now, the ZSM export module does not support the PCM channel of VERA, so don't expect to use that channel and have it in your music on Commander X16, but other than that, it's completely functioning as a music tracker.
    3 points
  11. I just used AVRDUDE in Linux to burn the bootloader, worked like a charm. Loaded the "sketch" that acts as the systems ROM. Hooked it all up, loaded up Putty, and .... IT"S ALIVE! I know what I'm playing with all day today. I absolutely LOVE that first power on and boot feeling!
    3 points
  12. David has announced in his latest video that the CX16 is near production ready. May I ask, exactly where can we put our order for the CX16, when the CX16 goes for sale? On this WEB page? Where to look? Also, I want to make sure that there will be sufficient available orders to that i won't miss out on it. Sven
    3 points
  13. Yeah, the latest stuff from the HW enthusiasts has rendered stable SD reads.
    3 points
  14. We don't actually know, yet. The assumption at the time was that he's going to launch some sort of crowdfunding campaign, but he could choose to just open up orders on his web site, https://www.the8bitguy.com/ I'm also sure that you'll get plenty notice when the time comes. There will be an announcement on his YouTube channel, his Facebook presence, and here (of course.)
    3 points
  15. To be clear: we are holding the site in trust for 8-Bit Productions. We're happy to hand the domain and management over to David, should he ask for it. However, my understanding is that he's not interested in managing a forum - which is why a few of us decided to step in and take up the responsibility for the site in the first place. Otherwise, it would have been closed, and the information and software we'd already collected would have been lost. So I can't say what's actually going to happen when the computer launches. If I had to give it my best guess, David will likely sell the computer on his web site, and we'll continue to maintain this as a place for users to connect and learn.
    3 points
  16. I know a great amount of games I had on the C64 had a standardized start screen! Here it is!
    3 points
  17. So when I went to click on the "WOW!" icon, I couldn't find one. But I don't want to have to make do with "Like". So... oooooo oooooo oooo .oooooo. oooooo oooooo oooo .o. `888. `888. .8' d8P' `Y8b `888. `888. .8' 888 `888. .8888. .8' 888 888 `888. .8888. .8' 888 `888 .8'`888. .8' 888 888 `888 .8'`888. .8' Y8P `888.8' `888.8' 888 888 `888.8' `888.8' `8' `888' `888' `88b d88' `888' `888' .o. `8' `8' `Y8bood8P' `8' `8' Y8P
    3 points
  18. Hey everybody, I've been playing with my newly built 2MB memory expansion and on a whim thought I'd check how well STNICCC does at 10MHz (STNICCC requires 2MHz to run). Check it out!
    3 points
  19. Version 1.1

    47 downloads

    This is the initial version of Calliope, a music library player for Zsound's ZSM music files. The current version of the player is complete as a simple browser/player. You can put any .ZSM files into any folder and it will let you browse to it and play them. This is the initial version, and is far from implementing all the features I want to do. However, this is not a work-in-progress mockup - it is fully functional and useful for browsing your audio assets if you're making a game, or just like listening to tunes. The download includes a collection of various music I've collected and converted into ZSM format. The folders are organized by their source - most are from VGMrips.net (Arcade folder) but since the Zsound VGM conversion tool is able to convert other chips into the Commander X16's chips' formats, you'll find many tunes from Sega Genesis or games that used the YM2202. In the future, I will be adding even more chips to the conversion tool (NES APU being the one I intend to do next). Furnace / Deflemask folders are also present with a few examples from Deflemask's demos collection, and in the Furnace folder is a collection of tunes designed NATIVELY for the Commander X16. Furnace tracker supports VERA PSG, and I've built a fork which can export these tunes to ZSM format. Some members of the Furnace discord have submitted demo tunes which are included along with .TXT files giving them credit (no meta data in ZSM for such details). The next major feature will be to create, save, and load playlists of music and leave it running with your tunes playing back on REAL HARDWARE. What could be cooler than that? The download is in the form of an SD image, as emulators do not let you change directories on the Host FS.
    3 points
  20. I finally made the follow up video I promised about how to utilize these tools to generate the data needed for collisions in a Commander X16 game:
    3 points
  21. I've been a busy boy this summer working on something for the X16 that has gotten really out of hand - a Duke Nukem style 3d first person shooter game engine. Yes, it's possible. This computer is going to have a ton of software available right out of the gate.
    2 points
  22. Just in case anyone's been looking for information on how to write code for the YM2151, the Offical documentation now has a register reference in the style of the other documentation sections, and also includes a short "getting started" tutorial on the task of communicating with the chip. It doesn't go into FM instrument design theory, as that's beyond the scope of such a document. https://github.com/commanderx16/x16-docs/blob/master/X16 Reference - 09 - Sound Programming.md
    2 points
  23. Greg Nacu's C64OS has dealt with making user interface/experience elements out of characters by... redesigning the font. Sort of like the old Apple MouseText. We don't need to reinvent the wheel here, necessarily, though... @JimmyDansbo's VTUI might be useful as a starting point.
    2 points
  24. I saw this Youtube today (though it was obviously posted almost a year ago), and it got me thinking: Building a NEW Commodore 1581 Disk Drive in 2021! Back in the day, I used some of my Peace Corps readjustment allowance on a C128D system, replacing the C128 that I donated to the high school I was teaching at in Grenada in the mid 1980's. In addition to the built in 1571, I got an external 1571 and 1581, as well as a daisywheel printer. After I fried the processor in the 128D, my bank account said I was fully re-adjusted (and working as a temporary industrial worker to bridge the gap before starting grad school in the Fall), so the system I took to Grad School was my original C64, a portable color TV (with massive ghosting of one of the colors), a 1571, 1581, and daisywheel printer. I had also picked up WarpSpeed for the C128, which had a small slide switch to toggle between C128 and C64 use, so my old C64 finally got a drive accelerator cartridge. My use of the 1571 was primarily for sharing text files and internet downloads between the IBM XT's in the grad student computer lab (because Profs had been upgraded to ATs or better) and my set-up at home, copying files over using Big Blue Reader. My working drive was almost always my 1581. I didn't have a big stockpile of retail games, but I did have a pile of disks from before I left for Grenada, so the 1571 was also for digging into my legacy disks. With my WarpSpeed cartridge, I would type up papers with my Busy Bee "TheWriteStuff" word processor, stored on my 1581 ... and I normally just copied TheWriteStuff onto the 1581 disk, since there was plenty of room on the disk alongside the program. So I, unfortunately, have a lot more nostalgia for my 1581 than for my 1571 or 1541. For the X16, the 1581 is an appealing option for the IEC port. Compatibility with C64 game copy protection is the number one appeal of the 1541/1571, but that is not an issue for the X16. And by 2022, 3.5" disks are just about as retro as 5.25" inch disks, while still having all of the benefits of better storage and better storage capacity. I say "unfortunately" because if you go to eBay, a 1581 is going to run you $300-$500. However, it turns out that thanks to the magic of retro projects to replace this and that part of a 1581, you can put together a replacement for a 1581 system, as explained in the video. Now, according to his budget tally on the end, the total cost will vary widely depending on how much your can get used or even recycled, and if you buy all new, it can cost upward of $300, which is similar to the eBay cost of a new working version. However, if you get lucky with parts and/or you have a 3D printer and are OK with a 3D printed case, you might be able to get one made for $150-$200. Plus, you would have the satisfaction of having soldered the controller board yourself!
    2 points
  25. Even at the time of the NES, unlicensed games were sold that worked on the NES. And you don't even have to look on the label for the fact that the "Licensed by Nintendo" stamp is nowhere to be found, since they typically come in cartridge cases that look different from an "official" NES cartridge - black, silver, blue, often with slightly different details in the shell shape and label shape. The thing is, this comes from the plastics production technology at the time. To get uniform look and feel, you'd need to use the same injection molds, and to get uniform color, you'd need to get the plastic produced by the same production process. If color match is important today, we can get it by having cameras that take a picture of the product as it is passing through the line and a robot faulting parts that are out of match, so that the line can be taken down and the color adjusted ... but they didn't have that system available back then. Anytime the cartridge shell from that era has a uniform look and feel, and especially uniform color, we can be confident that the production of the games was under the control of the console manufacturer ... not necessarily at a factory owned by, say, Nintendo, but in any event at a factory that Nintendo contracted with to supply Nintendo 1st party games, so they would not be willing to get Nintendo angry by making the cartridges for someone unless they had a Nintendo license for their game. Those are the games with the Licensed by Nintendo stamp if they come from a 3rd party game developer. I don't know first hand that Nintendo had an official splash page look and feel guide for games applying for licensing ... but I do know that they had an approvals process, and from Nintendo's reputation, it's hard to imagine they didn't have an official style guide.
    2 points
  26. This is looking great! I also know how pleasant is the time spending assembling the board. Also I see you are enjoying using this PCB holder as much as I am. )
    2 points
  27. Oh no, when I look using my desktop monitor in the office, I misread the file name OBASIC.COM as QBASIC.COM. Oops. I am going to blame my cataracts, because I don't want to say anything bad about my loyal and trusty laptop. The legend says that that is MBasic v4.51.
    2 points
  28. I would be fine with a house style on "official project CX16" software, but for the general range of niche and hobbyist stuff, I am happy if it has a bit of a funky, pell mell feel.
    2 points
  29. Sorry for my late answer. That is exactly right. When vblank is triggered the active and inactive buffer switch places. Then I update the inactive one. If scrolling for example to the right I use hardware scrolling for 15 pixels, then I update all tiles on the tilemap that can be seen when the buffer is active. Here I benefit from the higher processor speed compared to a C64 which gives me plenty of time to do this. 8 Mhz makes a huge difference compared to 1 Mhz … Am I making myself clear?
    2 points
  30. I'm fine with demos, sometimes they evolve into games etc. But I fully agree on cracktros... I hated them. As for standardised title screens: Not sure about that. I think I'd prefer to keep my individual and artistic freedoms to do whatever I think is suitable for each game or software. Maybe I would settle to a certain standard of my own over time. For Bixx for example the title screen and options/instructions are one screen. For Invaderz I opted for a separate title screen and another screen for instructions/options because there wasn't enough space for both on one - and I wanted to show off the graphics I created (and what the X16 can do).
    2 points
  31. I would say that it is close to impossible to make homebrew hackers and hobbyists conform to such a standard. It may be possible to see something similar if a group of people go together to create a bunch of titles for the CX16.
    2 points
  32. Long time lurker, first time poster. I’ve been re-learning BASIC programming since I got COVID last year and had the time. My first computer was an Apple II+, a present for my ninth birthday, in 1994. While I’ve been a millwright and, most recently, a farmer (which has just literally dried up) by occupation, my love for retro computing and gaming has always burned brightly, but recent circumstances gave me the time to take a deeper dive into the scene. My first game, HUNGEE FROG, is available on the LowresNX fantasy console web page. I look forward to contributing to the X16 software and community. Thank You, jimmyjab
    2 points
  33. Hello from Albany, NY. I'm a software developer with 50 years of experience with BASIC, Fortran, C, C++, Java, Python, and a number of assembler languages. I currently write a lot of BASIC applications for the Color Maximite 2, but am very interested in the Commander X16, and I am eager to get one when sales start.
    2 points
  34. Hat tip to @DusanStrakl for making this!
    2 points
  35. At this point it's probably easier to buy a PS/2 to 1351 mouse converter. https://www.ebay.com/itm/164496390269 https://www.pcbway.com/project/shareproject/PS_2_Mouse_adapter_for_Commodore_64__1351_mouse_hardware_emulation_.html https://retrocomputerstore.com/products/ps2-to-1351-mouse-adapter-for-commodore-64-c64-128-c128 https://www.tindie.com/products/baldengineer/commodore-1351-to-ps2-mouse-adapter/ Or just search for '1351 mouse converter' on your search engine of choice.
    1 point
  36. 1 point
  37. One of the main reasons I wanted to build the Z80-MBC2 was to give me the opportunity to learn on real hardware, and this “modern homebrew” machine is as close as I am going to get. Like I said, I can give you a basic overview of how these machines work, but this is simple enough I can really dig into how to make it work for me. So not only is this for fun, but it’s also a learning tool I can use to teach myself how to utilize it instead of just using what others create. This one uses the AtMega32 basically as the system ROM, and I still need to get that programmed so I can get it up and running. I ordered a 2 pack of USBASP programmers, and they don’t seem to play well with Windows 10, I failed to notice that when I ordered them, so I am going to try them on Ubuntu and see how that goes. I’ll get this thing up and running sooner or later. You had me for a second, I thought to myself, didn’t that come out in the early 90’s? I do plan on playing around in Microsoft Basic, and maybe Cobol, for the pure nostalgia of it, I haven’t messed with either since the 80’s. Not sure where I’m going to go from there, we’ll see. Yeah, that simple little cheap PCB holder is great to have, I have used it quite a bit!
    1 point
  38. I worked in the early 2000's on updating the automation a plastic plant making Lexan. While making other plastics may be different, I'd suspect that they are very similar in processing/manufacturing. Basically the start is to make plastic resin from petrochemicals which results in a powder like material (think like flour) which has a consistent default natural colour - off white. This stage was done in a separate plant on the facility. It was then blown over via a pipe to the extruding plant which was the factory I worked on re-automating. Other chemicals are added for various properties, such as colour following a pre-determined recipe, measured by weight. All the chemicals in a batch are then mixed in powder form. It then goes into a melting pot together to create something that had the constancy of a thick glue - think like candle wax. This process occurred in basically a heated tube with an auger in it called an extruder. if you've ever used a meat grinder that's what to think of. It comes out hot and gets put into a water bath the cools and sets the strands forming a hard continuous plastic rod. These strands then get chopped up into little pellets, dried and off to storage bins. Here is where the pellets get checked for colour against a standard. Scrapping it doesn't make sense given the effort and cost of the raw materials. If there is off-product (ie not matching the standards - not the right colour) the batch of pellets are sold to a customer who doesn't require a specific tolerance on a property. Colour doesn't matter if the part isn't going into a piece that isn't visible, or the end customer doesn't care about it. Off-product is sold at a discount, but I assume not at a loss. There were certain regions that were known to want the cheapest product rather than an exact colour (or property.) In making pellets, the next batch might be of a different colour for a different customer. Rather than shut the extruding line down, attempt to clean the extruder out (if possible) then start up the next batch, the next batch would go in just after the last one. This method saved time and money, but created pellets with"in-between" colour (and other properties) which were off-product but still desirable by some customers. This in-between was sent to a different storage bin, which might have pellets from another transition between batches. The in-spec coloured pellets are then sold to a customer who uses them to mold whatever they want. I'm assuming that Nintendo had a manufacturer mold the cartridge for them rather than make it themselves, much like they would buy the burnt/masked ROMs from a supplier. If the molder didn't meet Nintendo's colour spec, I assume that Nintendo would not purchase the shipment. Robot colour quality control is rather expensive and difficult especially with vision systems, or at least in the time I was in the automation field. I worked in several industries over a wide range of manufacturing such as automotive, food processing and pharmaceuticals and only saw a few in my time. The issues with lighting, production speed and other factors made it costly to automate. In the computer assembly plants I worked in humans did the assembly of parts to make a machine. An automated robotic system could be built to do the assembly, but one would have to be making mass amounts of computers for a long period of time for it to be cost effective. With case changes, technology advancements (how many processor form factors have you seen since CPUs came in DIPs?) and other items, the time to design, develop, build and roll out would far exceed the lifespan the resultant product would have. On the other end of the spectrum bottling is a process that automation makes sense given the quantity and consistency of the product. Cans and bottles don't frequently change in size or shape; just the contents. Anyone for an "old" Coke verse "new" Coke flame war? All of the above may be more than you ever wanted to know, and just vaguely related to retro computing but you did get it for free though
    1 point
  39. For the NES in North America, Nintendo at first required third-party publishers to agree to onerous terms including Nintendo itself being the sole manufacturer of the cartridges themselves. Atari / Tengen manufactured their own cartridges anyway, causing litigation.
    1 point
  40. Very true. Now, $300 still sounds like a lot of money for the project, and I'm always looking for the cheap angle. I'm still thinking about that Raspberry Pi 1581 emulator.
    1 point
  41. An idea is to have some official quality mark that can be given to software that meet certain demands. Those games/programs that are acknowledged can then have a certain title screen or badge in common. Compare for example how all Apple Arcade games start with a very short animated logotype intro. After that they all look very different. This could also be very motivating for developers in our community to make finished and stable products.
    1 point
  42. Oooh I like an "Official X16" style... A sprite that looks like a sticker??
    1 point
  43. Done more work on the engine ... so now the animations of the sprites can be dynamically loaded into vram and using a least recently used cache implementation, the images are placed with newer ones on the fly, when they are needed. In other words, this is a VERA VRAM resource management method ... Have a look at the below video. It has taken me a lot of work to make this ... https://screencast-o-matic.com/watch/c3QlFQVOoQS
    1 point
  44. If you don't like cracktros, you can of course buy the game.
    1 point
  45. The best way to have consistency is to start a company and pay people to follow a template. I think the greatest thing about the X16 is the flexibility it provides homebrew developers while still having the immediacy of a simple 8-bit system. Giving them an arbitrary box to sit in is not going to work. It's like trying to get a picture of your cat in a box. He'll just hop out and wander away, and then come back and sleep in the thing all night when the camera isn't there.
    1 point
  46. Sven, it's quite useful to read the Wikipedia entry on the processor. It is not an in-depth programmer's manual, but it gives a surprisingly comprehensive overview of the architecture. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WDC_65C816
    1 point
  47. Now it just needs the sound. Under 90 seconds though, that's fantastic.
    1 point
  48. By the way, a wireless 3.5" is a brilliant idea.
    1 point
  49. Open Sourcing the ROM ... that would be a reason to provide an alternative "OS". I'm not 100% sure that there is another one. See, the thing is that the X16 "OS" is more a BIOS ("Basic Input/Output System") kernel than what most people would think of as an "operating system" today. Since it allows you to program on the bare metal, what would be an "alternative operating system" in a modern computer doesn't actually need to REPLACE the X16 "OS" ... the X16 "OS" will happily load anything and let it take over completely.
    1 point
  50. Version 1.0.0

    584 downloads

    Boulder Dash style game written in Commander X16 BASIC for learning purposes. Link to detailed description and access to source code on my blog: https://www.8bitcoding.com/p/crazy-boulder.html
    1 point
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