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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/24/20 in all areas

  1. There is some hope: I ordered a replacement PCB. An affordable waste if it doesn't work, but I believe I can do it myself. Needless to say, despite the small preparations I've made, I'm going to be more aggressive about backing up data.
    2 points
  2. Stumbling across this is one of the happier moments in my life. I'm a professional web/app dev for 3+ years now with no computer science background (I went through a coding bootcamp) and I've been struggling to find different ways of "teaching" myself computer science. While I've found lots of great resources and have started toying with the idea of fiddling with assembly on the raspberry pi, I've been jealous of everyone that "got started" on all these old systems from the 80's where you "had" to use BASIC or assembly. This is literally a dream come true for me!
    1 point
  3. q@Starsickle I'm sorry to hear what happened, sucks indeed. Let us know if the HDD can ve revived. I'd also like to backup SlithyMatt. Git (and GitHub) is a great way to manage and backup your coding work. I had to use it for my work - and I bet you, I wouldn't have done it on my own. Even the simplest things required a lot of googling - sometimes even now. But it's worth it. The whole project history gets saved and you can visit any point on the timeline. It's great. Now I use it for my hobby stuff, too.
    1 point
  4. "Learning Computer Science" is a pretty broad goal and, short of getting an actual degree, is difficult to quantify. If you want to learn the basics of computer science, like why languages do what they do, there a lot of things to explore. A lot of great content on YouTube, actually, as good as any University lecture. Chances are, coming from web stack straight into 8-bit assembly, you'll be hopelessly lost. You may want to try gradually stepping down your level of abstraction. Build a console-based program with Python, then try to do the same thing with C. Learning the different languages and seeing how they deal with data should help you connect the dots. If you want to press further down the ladder of abstraction, then try assembly. Doing ARM assembly for a Raspberry Pi is not the best idea, as that is a platform designed to have many layers of abstraction between bare metal and userspace. The X16, however, is a perfect platform for learning assembly. It was designed to have you directly access everything, not depend on a big operating system and countless drivers and services.
    1 point
  5. That is great to hear. It's how I started as well (as a kid), on the Commodore-64 in the mid 80's first basic but quite soon assembly. Later, assembly on the Amiga and then C -> C++ -> Java and Python -> C# and Kotlin (present time).
    1 point
  6. Nice! I often prefer "function over form", I always have. So your workspace looks perfectly normal to me. I have seen other C64's in the past with dust covers like that one. I never had one personally, but I did used to put this fabric cover I had over it when I was not using it for any long period of time. It was made to fit the C64 to it just slipped right over it nice and snug. Lastly, space is also my problem. I have a small desk and workspace, and it's already taken up by my main PC, 2 displays, a server PC, and various other random hardware and parts, as well as my tool sets. Still, where there's a will, there's a way. lol Very cool! I used to run BONIC a lot, but it's been several years. I was a big fan of Seti@Home. I like seeing people running Raspberry Pi systems. I have the original B+ and a 3B+, had both since they were released. The old Model 1 B+ used to run Retropie for 16-bit and earlier console emulation, but the newer versions of Retropie run so slowly on it that I moved all my emulation to the much more capable 3B+, and I am able to easily push into the PS1/N64 era as well as much better arcade emulation. The 3B+ is also a very capable Steam Link device, also via Retropie. That's what I have installed in that Retroflag MegaPi case you see on my desk in the photo above. Not to mention, Wi-Fi makes SFTP so much more convenient. I have been looking at the Pi 400, but to be honest, the more I look at it, the more I think I would enjoy a Model 4B 4GB or 8GB instead. Same basic hardware configuration anyway, but with the 4B I save space, and as you can see on my desk photo, I really don't have room for a 400. I also already have all the other necessary peripherals, plus I get to put it in my own choice of case since it's the standard Pi 4 form factor. lol
    1 point
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