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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/12/20 in all areas

  1. I was able to find a prefect LCD match for X16 - Orion TV 812 - screen format is 4:3, resolution is 640 x 480 pixels, VGA input. I found it in local sale announcements, and now it's my treasure. )
    2 points
  2. Version 0.3.0

    123 downloads

    This is an unofficial concept program for a CX16 menu. Modify the DATA statements to add your submenus and commands. This is currently just a demo to explore the look and and feel of a basic, BASIC menu. Since it does not clear the screen, it is useful as an autoboot menu. New: uses a new API to push keys into the keyboard buffer. This allows the LOAD and RUN to operate outside of the running program, preventing problems that occur when chaining programs in BASIC.
    1 point
  3. Version 0.5.1

    2074 downloads

    X16 Edit is a text editor for the Commander X16 platform. Design goals: Use plain text files Store text buffer in banked RAM (512KB to 2 MB) Handle large text buffers efficiently Simple modeless user interface inspired by GNU Nano Implement basic editing functions well - refrain from making the program too feature-rich Support both ISO and PETSCII modes Emulator and Kernal requirements: X16 Edit versions 0.0.1-0.3.6 are tested with the official R38 X16 Edit versions 0.4.0-0.4.5 are tested with an emulator and Kernal compiled from the Github master branch (Kernal commit 7bfa81a to f62e25a). X16 Edit version 0.5.0 is tested with the official R39 and R40 Run with the following command: x16emu -sdcard sdcard.img -prg X16EDIT-x.x.x.PRG -run (rom version < R40) where x.x.x is the program version. The above method doesn't work in ROM version R40. Instead you need to store the X16EDIT-.x.x.x.PRG file on the SD card. Start the emulator with x16emu -sdcard sdcard.img. In the emulator type LOAD"X16EDIT-x.x.x.PRG" to load the program, and then RUN to start it. Please read the attached file romnotes.pdf if you want to try the ROM version. Source files available at https://github.com/stefan-b-jakobsson/x16-edit Released under GNU General Public License v 3 or later. manual.pdf romnotes.pdf
    1 point
  4. The Byte Attic is currently running a series on creating his own Pet/ZX81 compatible 8 bit micro, it's a great view.
    1 point
  5. I've got a PCX format viewer up and running now! The RLE decompression was quite simple it turned out. Amiga IFF viewer also working, again, the RLE decompression is pretty simple. BMP viewer also working. If I can get that 6502 DEFLATE routine someone linked to me working, PNG will close the list, however that source code is in a weird assembler format and the various filter processing routines in the PNG standard make it quite complex and slow I think.... Also the decompressed image data has to fit in memory all at once which make it rather problematic to actually show any image of interesting size.... I think I'm going to skip PNG for now. They're all separate programs at the moment, I'll integrate them all into one generic image viewer that supports all formats (except PNG for now)
    1 point
  6. Yeah, TGA is quite programmer-friendly, but many (most?) TGA files are written bottom to top, which means you'll probably have to reload VERA's address register for every line of the bitmap. I remember playing around with Turbo Pascal back in the 90's, writing a TGA image viewer for files created by POV-Ray and being quite surprised when the image finally showed up, only upside-down. Of course, I only had a faint idea what that thing they call the Internet was and you can imagine it was quite difficult obtaining file format specifications. Ahhhh, happy days
    1 point
  7. Thanks for the tip! I bought one too that I found on German Ebay. It was not the easiest to understand the German I can say but ”bieten” obviously meant what I was hoping for : ).
    1 point
  8. It's not something I ever owned, or had even heard of until very recently, but the ACC 8000 seems to the perfect 8bit machine: An Apple II clone with a Z80 and 6809 on the motherboard, plus built in 80 column card, floppy controller, battery-backed real-time clock, parallel and serial interfaces, RGB, NTSC/PAL and monochrome composite video output and 128K RAM, this could run Pro-DOS, CP/m and Flex OS. Oh, and a mechanical keyboard. It looks great too!
    1 point
  9. The Turbo Chamelon 64 offers a turbo mode, I do remember a post on Lemon64 where someone had patched a strategy game to speed up the computer's "thinking time" and disabled turbo mode when control was returned to the player.
    1 point
  10. I like it plain and simple: I run Win7 with 7+ Taskbar Tweaker, Classic Shell and Directory Opus.
    1 point
  11. I will definitely be buying the Mega 65 and X16...and will have the new cost reduced C256 very shortly. The main draw for the X16 for me is that the userbase will be huge, relatively speaking. I do worry that the lack of updates will negatively impact that potential large userbase - as they move on to other things. I thought this forum was the main repository of X16 stuff; I can’t stomach doing much on Facebook these days. I suppose if announcements will be made over there then I could make a sock puppet to use. I’m torn on the Mega 65’s floppy drive. I keep three 5-1/4 floppy drives connected to an Atari 800XL, but I also use modern storage devices with it (including FujiNet, which is the bee’s knees). I have a soft spot for the old school home computer style computer in the keyboard styling of the Mega.
    1 point
  12. I too have been a bit concerned about the lack of updates, just because there's some clear momentum happening in the community and excitement that I think is important to the cause and shouldn't be overlooked. But I do understand folks are busy, and it's a pandemic! I quoted the above just to point out some of us have fled Facebook and no longer wish to use that platform. It's certainly a good community over there, but I think all the work done on this site should be celebrated and be really the first place information is posted. Just my $0.02 - I think ya'll are doing a great job, particularly given how much of a dumpster fire 2020 has been and look forward to things yet to come! Now, back to the question at hand. I've been keeping an eye on the Mega65 too though I don't know it's ins and outs. I'm definitely excited about all the New-Retro enthusiasm! I rather liked the C256 Fenix as well, though for different reasons than the X16. In brief, what draws me to the X16: It's own platform, granted with some compatibility with Commodore, but not an enhanced C64 compatible machine - it has departures in design which I like External keyboard Expansion Slots (for MIDI, Network, etc.) The RAM/ROM banks are a really clever way to manage larger amounts of RAM It doesn't seem to have some the complicated bagged of the C64 and is easy-ish to learn on (more VERA tutorials might be nice though) Nearly 16-bit graphics, but overall it's not too powerful and still largely will require assembly which I have found incredibly fun to learn (haven't touched it since college when it was LC2 and MIPS). I'm not too interested in writing in other languages as I can already do that on a modern machine Limited use of FPGAs Potentially different default sound solutions (I the SID a ton too but I thought at least evaluating FM and trying to use real chips is an interesting approach) Basic kernel/OS and full direct access to the hardware Offline-first. It might be a great machine to do computing on without distractions (I'm looking forward to tracking music, maybe using it to write blog posts offline) But could be online capable (excited to see if we end up seeing any X16 BBS's pop up, for example), but only if/when I want it I know it's debated, but I don't like the all-in-one design of the Mega65. I know many do but I never found all-in-ones good to type on and they are an odd form factor to store. I do like the floppy though, maybe in concept if not practice. I do have a wishlist of things I would like to see but given the goals of the project are unlikely, but overall I'm extremely excited about the direction of the X16. I think it hits the concept of a modern Retro computer perfectly without going too far overboard. I feel like it's less about nostalgia and retro and more about simplicity and approachability whereas the Mega seems more about nostalgia first. Not trying to take away anything from them by the way! But the X16 seems like a great computer to learn how a computer works in more ways than an Arduino or Pi can. I know assembly can be scary for some but it does really help in learning, on an intimate level, how computers work - including modern ones, and it's nice to see a compelling computer which, in a way, celebrates it by necessity? Simplicity is maybe the wrong word here, but so is Retro. "Retro" games on modern hardware pays homage but often I find it awkward as they're imposing false limitations that are of their own making that don't actually exist. Some games have done it amazingly well (Shovel Night comes to mind) but overall, the X16 will have games the X16 is capable of without sort of "faking it." and the limitations will be inherent to the platform rather than wishfully invented. I dunno, I'm not articulating that well but it's the thing I find most compelling about it. I don't feel like the X16 is paying homage to retro computer or looking backwards. Rather it's, well, David said he wanted a modern successor to the VIC20 and that's essentially what this. Modern creature comforts, enhanced designs, but still a computer of fundamentals.
    1 point
  13. An 8 Bit Guy update video would be welcome, it's true. I don't want them "stalled", but I'm kind of glad they're going slow, because I'm toying with a "shell" interpreter on the X16, and it's going QUITE slow as I haven't written a compiler since university, a looong tiiime agoooo. Maybe this thing can be useful, and maybe I can squeeze it into 16KB, and maybe it can be finished enough to go onto one of the ROM banks, maybe maybe maybe... a total long shot, but worth shooting for. Of course, even if it doesn't squeeze down into 16K and isn't done by any perceived deadline, it can still be software. The trick is first making it work and be useful.
    1 point
  14. Right, as I think David said, the only people who get nothing wrong are the people who do nothing. Whilst I can see the perspective of some people about some of the things, with nearly a million people having lost their lives from this terrible pandemic, abusing somebody because of an old metal screw is frankly preposterous. Some people need a reality check.
    1 point
  15. True. The only ones who never blow anything are the ones who are never doing repairs in first place.
    1 point
  16. Eh, all we learned is that David like everyone else is human and sometimes screws up; I don't see this having any significant impact on X16. In fact, it bolsters the case for making a new "retro" computer as we'll be able to fiddle with it without worrying we might be damaging vintage hardware.
    1 point
  17. I saw the "process" video, and saw that Computer Reset were helping him open those boxes. At that point, I realized "this is not valuable equipment". If it were, David would be using tweezers. I've seen how he tiptoes around Apple, Atari, and Commodore hardware.
    1 point
  18. Fair enough. Did you watch his response video? He cites several people stating the paperclip method as the first thing they would've done and a "go to" fix in tech support circles over the years. Either way you are right that it probably will not hurt sales. If I had seen Jay Miner do something with a dremel, it wouldn't have stopped me buying an Amiga [emoji6]
    1 point
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