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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/24/21 in all areas

  1. Version 1.0.0

    94 downloads

    I played this game with my friends in grade school on the PET. Though unable to find the original, I found a stripped-down VIC-20 version -- which showed me the program's essential structure -- and the later 1986 version by Commodore, mainly designed for the Commodore 64. I used both to create this version, which retains the original algorithms, and tries to emulate the older PET version. It uses very little X16-specific code -- exactly, SCREEN and COLOR. It relies on the 40 x 25 screen, and it uses just about all 25 of those rows. The rest is all PETSCII and BASIC 2.
    3 points
  2. Version 0.0.3

    105 downloads

    I have been playing with the VERA chip in assembly, and have come up with a cheeky little demo screen that is reminiscent of some 80s demos I can remember as a kid. No music or fancy interactive stuff, but some of you might find it amusing. Warning: As a GP I feel I ought to point out this demo contains flashing / strobing effects! Thanks to the excellent tutorials of SlithyMatt - Commander X16™ Community, especially the latest one demystifying the VERA chip. I have used a lot of his code from the latest tutorial to create this demo.
    3 points
  3. Hi, thanks to contributions from András Péteri, the vbcc compiler now comes with support for the X16. I am not very familiar with this machine, but the generated code seems to work well in an X16 emulator. Please let me know if something does not work. So far there is no banking support for this target yet. I am not sure about the state of development, but if the banking scheme is finalized, it would probably be a good idea to add the necessary library routines. A few of the good things: - compiler is under active development - supports C99 (variable-length arrays, designated initializers etc.) - generates optimized code (see dhrystones in sample directory) - supports banked memory and far-pointers - (limited) floating point support based on Steve Wozniaks code - (pretty good) 32/64bit IEEE floating point support based on SANE - support for 65C02 extensions - support for writing interrupt handlers - attributes for putting variables into zero page - supports stack-frames > 256 bytes Changes since r1: - new target: MEGA65 (native mode, some banking support) - new target: Commander X16 (thanks András Péteri) - new options -prefer-statics/-force-statics (allocate local variables in static memory rather than on the stack) - new option -range-opt (first implementation of some range-based optimizations changing induction variables to smaller types) - added support for o65 object file format - added support for Oric target format - better use of x register - improved cross-module function-inlining - IEEE math library works with 65c02 - several code generation improvements - fixed several bugs - slightly reworked examples
    2 points
  4. Version 1.0.0

    30 downloads

    This is a demo to try out how far VERA can be pushed: it is quite hard to have vertically (independently) scolling bars using VERA. What this demonstrates is that it is in possible. But only just. It turns out I had to use 80 sprites in combination with a lot of LINE-interrupts. Here is what I did: - Create a 64 pixel by 5*64 pixel colored data rectangle (in this example filled with 4x4 pixel squares) - Place 80 sprites (of 64x64 pixels) from left to right, overlapping mostly, but showing the 4 left pixels of each sprite - These sprites are (vertically) grouped in pairs, so that each pair is placed one pixel lower than the pair next to it on the right - The data address of each sprite (where they get their colored pixels from) are initially set to the same point (they all start with an vertical offset of 0) - For each low-res LINE-interrupt (that is: 240 times per frame) we do the following: - move one pair of sprites (that are *just* out of view) 64 pixels down - change the data address so that it matches it individual vertical-offset - At the end of all the LINE-interrups (after the 240 lines) we do the following: - Adjust the vertical offsets with the individual change-per-frame numbers - Move all sprites back to the top, with negative y-coordinates (according to their offsets) It runs a maximum fps: every frame there is an update. Warning: this demo contains (what amounts to) flashing / strobing effects. # Known issues - There are small horizontal lines visible at certain places. This is probably because the LINE-interrupt code is not fast enough # Comparing hardware with emulator I think this demo will probably not work (exactly) the same on real hardware. It's probably a good way to check whether the emulator is accurate (for certain aspects of the VERA board). # To Compile: cl65 -t cx16 -o VBS.PRG -l vbs.list vbs.asm # To Run: x16emu.exe -prg VBS.PRG -run Regards, Jeffrey
    2 points
  5. What @SlithyMatt said ... this isn't the scale for licensing out. And independent of selling a batch of systems to a foreign vendor, it's premature to work out whether it makes sense to have a quantity price break ... first the crowdfunding has to be launched, then it has to succeed, then the first systems have to be shipped, and then the market has to be tested to see if it will support ongoing production. It's a bit like planning on how to spend your Kentucky Derby winnings before the colt has been born.
    2 points
  6. Version 1.0.0

    13 downloads

    After seeing others post conversions of classic basic programs, I remembered this one where the computer plays an animal guessing game with you. It tries to guess your secret animal by asking questions about it, and if it doesn't know the animal, it asks about your chosen animal so it knows about it the next round! (It's basically building a binary search tree) note: all knowledge is lost when the program exits. (maybe I'll make a future version where it can save/load the animals and questions) Source code is here: https://github.com/irmen/prog8/blob/master/examples/animals.p8
    1 point
  7. VERA Demo Screen written in assembly View File I have been playing with the VERA chip in assembly, and have come up with a cheeky little demo screen that is reminiscent of some 80s demos I can remember as a kid. No music or fancy interactive stuff, but some of you might find it amusing. Warning: As a GP I feel I ought to point out this demo contains flashing / strobing effects! Thanks to the excellent tutorials of SlithyMatt - Commander X16™ Community, especially the latest one demystifying the VERA chip. I have used a lot of his code from the latest tutorial to create this demo. Submitter gavinhaslehurst Submitted 02/24/21 Category Demos  
    1 point
  8. Oh no! I've gone cross-eyed! Seriously though, looks good, some dazzling effects!
    1 point
  9. Strider, I still have a boxed Commodore Plus/4 in storage... perhaps one day I'll fish it out and explore further? It had a really nice form factor and tactile nature, that much I can remember. Despite its shortcomings, I really don't think that the Plus/4 had its day in the sun... probably because of no other reason than it wasn't compatible with its older 64K sibling! Apparently, many of its original developers subsequently worked on the Commodore 128 - so I guess that the Plus/4 project wasn't exactly an unmitigated disaster, after all...?
    1 point
  10. Cyber, these computers are great! I especially love the POISK and its imposing plug-in cartridges (at least, that's what I assume them to be). Ukrainian machines, perhaps...?
    1 point
  11. Hi everyone just a quick post to say a BIG HELLO from the UK ... really excited about this project and looking forward to getting my hands on some kit / hardware!
    1 point
  12. Things I'm gonna describe was not odd at my region, but might be odd for the rest of the world. I had a POISK computer (it's an IBM PC clone with integrated CGA graphics). It was a simple MS DOS PC. It could run from compact cassetes, but I used 5 inch floppy drive with it. And despite CGA graphics was poor, I was always astonished what could be achived with only 4 colours and dithering. Metal Mutant, Playhouse Strippoker, Accolade Grand Prix, Accolade Cycles are few examples of how one can make a pretty CGA picture. My friend had a Robik computer (ZX Spectrum clone). Was used with compact casseted only. Had great games, but loading from cassete was always a frustration... And my other friend had a Dendy game console (NES/Famicom clone). Not a computer, but also a tech of my childhood. Had tons of games on cartriges, and we smashed its controlllers like mad. By the way, may be it's just nostalgia, but I still find this controller the most comfortable for me. I always had mixed and contradictory impressions when compared these devices. I could never say which one is better and more powerful. Each one had its own edge. POISK always seemed inferior with its 4 colours graphics, but actually it was more modern and sophisitcated machine. While Dendy (NES) had more dynamic games with rich graphics and sound, POISK (PC) had some more complex and more advanced games (and also had great programs for the era). Robik (ZX Spectrum) was much simpler and much cheaper than POISK (PC) but had 16 colours graphics, which was always strange to me. Even today I'm still surprised why IBM PC line started with CGA? PC itself was pretty competitive, but CGA was a huge downside. EGA (which arrived later) was much better for competition. Wonder why didn't (or couldn't) they start with EGA kind graphics.
    1 point
  13. Version 1.0.0

    13 downloads

    Here's a utility that will display the contents of any memory page at the top of the screen, actively and persistently. Helps to see what's going on in different areas of memory, like zero page, the stack, page $02, page $03, page $9f, page $a0 (bank 0). I found it useful to track down memory locations for the mouse aid program, specifically quote mode and insert mode flag locations. LOAD"XPAGEX",8,1 SYS 1024 (NEW to reset BASIC memory pointers, if need) Just POKE 99,<page number> to change pages. There's a "ruler" to help you determine what location you're looking at. The 4 lines are 64 bytes each.
    1 point
  14. Yeah, I got the resemblence between butterfly logo and twintails. ) I don't have that much imagination to create beautiful resemblence for other characters...
    1 point
  15. The lawyer fees alone to do that would add more to the cost than any tax you would have to pay for an import. Nobodys doing Amstrad-level business in Europe with the X16 to get the needed volume.
    1 point
    Kinda fun, the delays before being able to move on could be tweaked or eliminated imho. (In other words, why have a delay before presenting "press space to continue"?)
    1 point
  16. Lemonade Stand View File I played this game with my friends in grade school on the PET. Though unable to find the original, I found a stripped-down VIC-20 version -- which showed me the program's essential structure -- and the later 1986 version by Commodore, mainly designed for the Commodore 64. I used both to create this version, which retains the original algorithms, and tries to emulate the older PET version. It uses very little X16-specific code -- exactly, SCREEN and COLOR. It relies on the 40 x 25 screen, and it uses just about all 25 of those rows. The rest is all PETSCII and BASIC 2. Submitter rje Submitted 02/23/21 Category Games  
    1 point
  17. It's so cringey seeing people pile on top of David more under that comment saying, "Why did he delete comments? Too sensitive for criticism?" Not enough faces in the world to palm.
    1 point
  18. There is no such mode in the VGA specification. So no, I doubt they considered a resolution that does not exist.
    1 point
  19. My A1200 was still my main (in fact, only) computer until 1999, although by then it was in a tower case with VGA graphics, ethernet, TV tuner, PCI slots, a PowerPC accelerator and around 10GB of storage. I used it for gaming, web-browsing and email, playing MP3s etc. In 1999 I got given a PC which was just about capable of playing Half-Life, that's what finally pulled me to the dark side
    1 point
  20. There's a Commodore 64 GEOS gopher client, imaginatively called geoGopher. https://www.lyonlabs.org/commodore/onrequest/geos/geoGopher/index.html I supposed if there were Internet of some sort connected to the Commander X16 it might be ported to the X16, too.
    1 point
  21. Yes, but you will have to copy the secondary character set to it's own space in VRAM. I show an example of how to do that in my last tutorial video:
    1 point
    Very cool idea! Was thinking of doing something like this myself in assembly, but you've beaten me to it
    1 point
  22. Thanks Jake. I agree and with powerful hardware supported graphics and 8Mhz clock speed a lot can be done in BASIC. I am working mostly on my Assembly tutorials now but I am sure I will add some more BASIC tutorials and games soon.
    1 point
  23. David can blow up what ever he wants. Paper clip? I have no issue. (Done that myself) Cut a computer in half and I will smile, laugh and cry with you. We are all here to have fun and learn and if people have an issue with that then do not watch the channel. Keep it up David. You are doing just fine.
    1 point
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