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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/13/21 in all areas

  1. 5 points

    Version 1.0.0

    11 downloads

    This weekend, I decided to play with X16 BASIC using the emulator and wound up making an X16 adaptation/extension of a short program for the Plus/4 that appeared in 'The Transactor' journal decades ago. The program uses three parameters: "S" (squiggles/spokes/segments), "W" (wave factor), and "A" (amplitude). Using X16 BASIC's extensions in terms of bitmap drawing commands, it outputs a neat design with lots of color and a surprising amount of visual variety. The original Plus/4 program just plotted in black and white and had some built in limitations (and at least two bugs), but I decided to extend the program, add a menu, and upload it after I added color and decided these were fairly cool looking results from such a short simple BASIC routine. It strikes me as a cool demo because with just three core parameters, you can get an astonishing range of outputs. Of course, like many graphics demos based on stacking transcendental functions, there are combos of inputs where the functions will sort of fall apart and produce something akin to a kiddo scribbling with crayons , but there are also weird "islands" in the domain of possible parameter combinations where order re-asserts itself, both in terms of what gets drawn and (because colors are picked by an AND mask over one of the function variables) how the colors play out. Note that I included a sample screen shot about some weirdness you can get with very high numbers. Mostly that is the result of my simple use of .01745 to convert between degrees and radians, and is caused by amplifying that really simplified rounding of PI/180. There are 4 'modes' of operation you can pick from the menu. You can specify inputs for S, W and A manually; the program can run a sequence with fixed S and A while incrementing W; there is a mode that tries to picks random parameters within several domains where the program produces nice outputs; and there's one that just reads the inputs from some "presets" in DATA statements. (You can of course add your own 'best of' examples by adding data statements between lines 432 and 499). I always considered myself a passable BASIC programmer, but this weekend showed me I'm really sort of rusty so please go easy on me if I did something inefficiently or especially 'dumb' in my implementation. The main output routine is extremely crunched (sorry, not sorry) and I did some further things to optimize from the original program for purposes of getting a bit more performance out of the main routine. Although it absolutely crawled on the Plus4, I think its fairly impressive on the X16 especially if you look at the sheer amount of sines, cosines, multiplications, and variable fetches /updates that occur during an entire cycle through the primary output drawing loops. The X16's 40 column mode (SCREEN $00) was used to key this in and format it, so its probably best if listed/ displayed/reviewed in that mode, Tested on emulator r.38, and I don't see anything in the pending updates for the next emulator release that would break anything here. If there are questions about why/how I did something I'll be happy to answer. In fact, if there's any interest in a more detailed write-up of this short and fairly simple program (e.g., section by section, and line-by-line), I would be happy to give it a shot, especially if there are folks new to Commodore BASIC that might find it useful. It seems to me there are many highly advanced programmers for the X16 posting on this site who are using assembly, C, and even languages they are developing themselves. Its amazing! However, its surely the case that part of the mission of the X16 is to get some newbies involved, and from where I sit, that really does mean getting some more content up here written in BASIC. Keeping that in mind, I'll probably be diving back into more old issues of The Transactor to do more conversions for the X16 and will continue to upload as long as I'm still having fun with BASIC. Cheers.
  2. 3 points
    Those are fair questions and I’ll answer as clearly as I can. I’ll start with why IO devices of the normal type like the VERA are impractical to put there. So to begin its good to clarify that it’s important that most of ZP be reserved for the intended ZP usage using a couple registers is fine because it leaves the bulk of the space free. Two registers which were also reserved on the 6510 is not a big deal. But tying up lots of registers is. I won’t disagree that having the VERA there wouldn’t be very useful, the main reason is you need to create a logic exclusion case where a 32 byte range are read or written from the VERA instead of RAM. This requires a fair amount of logic and that introduces timing delays which can cause lots of problems especially on reads. And creating an exclusion case for VERA (a 32 byte range) is more costly from a component/complexity than turning the entire ZP into IO. But turning the whole range into IO is too costly from a software/overall functionality standpoint to be considered either. So how then do we do an exclusion for two registers in ZP? The simple answer? We don’t. The bank registers are in fact RAM and latches. We don’t disable the RAM on reads or writes. The RAM at those locations is always active. However what we do implement is a shadow technique where on a write event to those locations a pair of latches (one for each address) will capture the contents of the data bus on the falling edge of the clock. This does not disable the RAM from also latching those same values, and in fact when you read those locations what you are reading back is the RAM, not the latches themselves, since they can’t actually be read. This isn’t a problem since the RAM will always (with one small exception) contain the last written value. The exception is on a hard reset. On a reset the latches always return to zero whereas RAM does not. So in theory after a reset the value stored in RAM and the value in the latch will mismatch. In practice this isn’t a problem since the reset routine will write to those locations which corrects the mismatch. So the trick we are doing while it does add a few parts, has no impact on the timing of the system. It’s very simple and it’s inexpensive. The parts used cost much less than devoting a relatively costly 65c22 to do the same task. And we aren’t eliminating the 65c22 gets freed up to do more important things. End result is the X16 has more free IO for the user than the Commodore machines did. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  3. 2 points
    You can never go wrong with wood grain! LGR would love it! lol Yeah, OpenWRT is nice, as is Pi-Hole. Currently, most of mine are being used for emulation purposes though. Two of those are Pi 3B+ units running RetroPie (in Sega Genesis and NES inspired cases), and a single Pi Zero W sitting in a GPi Handheld Case also running RetroPie (Yeah, I really like RetroPie... lol). I have a Pi 4 8GB sitting in an Argon M.2 Case running off an M.2 128GB SSD, that's my "just for fun" and learning unit. Seeing what I can get it to do, mainly running Pi OS. My old Pi 1B+ is being used to assist with some Arduino projects. So they are getting used in one form or another. For me, "tinkering" is what I do to relax and have fun when at home. One of the reasons I started this thread was I got to thinking about that old ADAM computer and kinda wished I still had it to mess with, even with it's laundry list of issues.
  4. 2 points
    Yes, the X16 is a very stimulating machine! And I'm not a 65c02 guru. I've written voxel engines on the Atari Falcon and Jaguar, and also in x86-64 assembly. But I'm new to this 8bit business. I started a couple of weeks ago with the excellent Youtube tutorials from Matt. So there may well be a few clever optimizations that could be done.
  5. 2 points
    I bought a color dot matrix printer (so awesome at the time) to go with my C128D, and I had one of those cassette port adapters. I'm very fortunate that it was either keyed or that I happened to insert it right side up!
  6. 1 point
    Hello From Boca Raton, Florida. Appreciate all the hard work you all have put in to make this a reality. Have a great day everyone!
  7. 1 point
    I ran across a few memes I liked that made me think ... What reminds me of the 80's? There is a LOT, especially when you include TV and music into the mix , but I narrowed it down to just a few items that popup the most in my memories, the things I used and loved to play with. Things we had that stuck in the minds of many people I am sure. The NES, console TV's, VCR's, the Sony Walkman, and of course, the Commodore 64. These are the original memes I found that got me thinking about this in the first place! So, what about you, what "things" take your mind back to the 80's? Besides the totally radical TV and music of the era.
  8. 1 point
    Vera Graphics Converter View File Version 0.1 This software converts indexed and RGBA images in the formats PNG, JPG or GIF into binary data suitable for the VERA chip in the upcoming 8-Bit Computer Commander X16. Basic usage: Open an image file using File/Open... Configure the settings according to your needs. Export the image using File/Export Bitmap/Tiles/Sprites... Image Modes: You can open either an indexed image with an embedded palette or a regular RGBA image. Depending on the image mode, the software behaves slightly differently. RGBA: In RGBA mode, VGC needs to match the pixel colors to the colors in the palette. This can be done by comparing color similarity in RGB (Red, Green, Blue), HSL (Hue, Saturation, Lightness) or HSV (Hue, Saturation, Brightness) mode. Select the conversion strategy that works best for your image. Ideally load a palette that matches all colors in the image. You can specify the bit depth of the image by changing the pixel mode. 1 Bit per Pixel results in 2 colors, 2 Bits per Pixel result in 4 colors, 4 Bits per Pixel result in 16 colors and 8 Bits per Pixel uses the whole palette of 256 colors. The colors usable by the image depend on the palette offset. Indexed: In indexed mode VGC assumes that all pixels in the image have the correct index. It is still necessary to select the correct palette offset to give a correct export. On export the palette offset is subtracted and the index value capped on the selected pixel mode. Transparency Any pixel in the image that has an alpha value of 255 is set to the index selected in "Transparent Color Index". The minimum value is the palette offset. Image Mode: The VERA Graphic chip has three modes. Bitmap, tiled with a tile dimension of 8 * 8 pixels and tiled with a tile dimension of 16 * 16 pixels. Both tile modes split the image in separate tiles and limit their number to 256, since the VERA chip cannot address more than 256 tiles. It is also possible to limit their number even further. To use a tile mode the width and height of your image must be divisible by 8 or 16. The VERA chips supports 4 different resolutions: 640x480, 320x480, 640x240 and 320x240. VGC does not enforce these resolutions. It is also possible to generate sprite maps. In sprite mode the tiles can have 8, 16, 32 or 64 pixels in width or height. They are however limited to 128 tiles, and similarly, the source images dimensions have to be divisible by the tile dimensions. Sprites can only have a color depth of 4 or 8 Bits per Pixel. PRG File Header It is possible to save the exported binary file with 2 leading bytes. This is necessary for some load routines in the Commander X16 Kernal. Splitting files The exported files can be saved in chunks of a given size. The VERA Video RAM is paged in pages of 2048 bytes. Files can be split at any page, depending on how you want to store or load your data. The PRG File Header is saved to every individual file. The Palette You can load and save the color palette in the Format used by the Gnu Image Manipulation Program (GIMP) Other software like Aseprite can read and save this format too. You can also export the palette in the format used by the VERA chip. The PRG Header option is applied to this as well. The file splitting is not. Analyzing the image. You can double click on colors in the palette to change them. When you hold the left mouse button on a color in the palette, the parts of the image using this color are highlighted. Similarly, when you click on the image the color in the palette is also highlighted. Submitter Sandmage Submitted 07/02/20 Category Dev Tools  
  9. 1 point

    Version 1.1.0

    32 downloads

    Aseprite script that converts the current palette into a 12-bit (4096 colour) palette, i.e. 4-bits per channel. To install in Aseprite, go to File -> Scripts -> Open scripts folder Then drop the script into that folder and restart Aseprite. You might also want to assign a hotkey to the script via Edit -> Keyboard Shortcuts. It's also useful for things like creating gradients. Just create a gradient in the normal way, then run the script, and each colour in the palette will be nudged into the closest CX16 colour.
  10. 1 point
    I can understand this feeling. I had a ton of equipment when I was younger and in college, but then I "grew up" and it all "disappeared". Now I am, little by little, getting things here and there, but missing my old stuff. I acquired a couple of TRS-80 CoCo 2's, one had a bad joystick port. I know lots of people dump on this system, but I always thought it was a blast. Love the old Loadrunner so got it up and playing. Created a joystick using a ATTiny85 and some leftover arcade parts. Trying for a Toshiba T1000 now. Really miss the 8088/8086 processor. I don't think I will get much more that this though. Other than the Commander x16 when it arrives!! About 10-20 years ago you could pretty much get anything you wanted for a decent price, but today I see mangled systems going for 100's. Sign of the times I guess. Have a great day everyone!
  11. 1 point
    Hi Scott, I'm sorry myself if I came across as miffed or something. You had described so precisely the approach I had taken to avoid the pitfall that @ZeroByte correctly pointed out that "That's exactly what I'm doing" jumped into my mind and keyboard. Rereading it, I realize that it has a ring to it that I hadn't intended. Thanks again to both of you, this was very helpful input.
  12. 1 point
    BASIC 'Twisted Transcendentals' View File This weekend, I decided to play with X16 BASIC using the emulator and wound up making an X16 adaptation/extension of a short program for the Plus/4 that appeared in 'The Transactor' journal decades ago. The program uses three parameters: "S" (squiggles/spokes/segments), "W" (wave factor), and "A" (amplitude). Using X16 BASIC's extensions in terms of bitmap drawing commands, it outputs a neat design with lots of color and a surprising amount of visual variety. The original Plus/4 program just plotted in black and white and had some built in limitations (and at least two bugs), but I decided to extend the program, add a menu, and upload it after I added color and decided these were fairly cool looking results from such a short simple BASIC routine. It strikes me as a cool demo because with just three core parameters, you can get an astonishing range of outputs. Of course, like many graphics demos based on stacking transcendental functions, there are combos of inputs where the functions will sort of fall apart and produce something akin to a kiddo scribbling with crayons , but there are also weird "islands" in the domain of possible parameter combinations where order re-asserts itself, both in terms of what gets drawn and (because colors are picked by an AND mask over one of the function variables) how the colors play out. Note that I included a sample screen shot about some weirdness you can get with very high numbers. Mostly that is the result of my simple use of .01745 to convert between degrees and radians, and is caused by amplifying that really simplified rounding of PI/180. There are 4 'modes' of operation you can pick from the menu. You can specify inputs for S, W and A manually; the program can run a sequence with fixed S and A while incrementing W; there is a mode that tries to picks random parameters within several domains where the program produces nice outputs; and there's one that just reads the inputs from some "presets" in DATA statements. (You can of course add your own 'best of' examples by adding data statements between lines 432 and 499). I always considered myself a passable BASIC programmer, but this weekend showed me I'm really sort of rusty so please go easy on me if I did something inefficiently or especially 'dumb' in my implementation. The main output routine is extremely crunched (sorry, not sorry) and I did some further things to optimize from the original program for purposes of getting a bit more performance out of the main routine. Although it absolutely crawled on the Plus4, I think its fairly impressive on the X16 especially if you look at the sheer amount of sines, cosines, multiplications, and variable fetches /updates that occur during an entire cycle through the primary output drawing loops. The X16's 40 column mode (SCREEN $00) was used to key this in and format it, so its probably best if listed/ displayed/reviewed in that mode, Tested on emulator r.38, and I don't see anything in the pending updates for the next emulator release that would break anything here. If there are questions about why/how I did something I'll be happy to answer. In fact, if there's any interest in a more detailed write-up of this short and fairly simple program (e.g., section by section, and line-by-line), I would be happy to give it a shot, especially if there are folks new to Commodore BASIC that might find it useful. It seems to me there are many highly advanced programmers for the X16 posting on this site who are using assembly, C, and even languages they are developing themselves. Its amazing! However, its surely the case that part of the mission of the X16 is to get some newbies involved, and from where I sit, that really does mean getting some more content up here written in BASIC. Keeping that in mind, I'll probably be diving back into more old issues of The Transactor to do more conversions for the X16 and will continue to upload as long as I'm still having fun with BASIC. Cheers. Submitter Snickers11001001 Submitted 04/13/21 Category Demos  
  13. 1 point
    I had checked out the project back in late 2019 (after the part 2 video was posted), but stopped paying attention as I got busy with real life. I recently thought about the project and decided to see how it was going. I had done some programming using the emulator back in 2019, so I checked out what changed. I saw that the memory banking changed from being in the VIA IO range to the zero page. When I saw it, I thought it was a cool change, but the more I think about it, the more confused I get. I don't have much understanding about hardware design (I'm more of a software person), and most of my understanding comes from the Ben Eater videos. What I do understand is that RAM/ROM banking requires something to hold the current banking value and set the address pins on the RAM/ROM chips high or low as needed. I understood how this worked before.; the VIA has the functionality to set and hold output values, which would be used to set the address pins. With the "Proto2" design, the goal was to free up the VIA outputs for other use, but I don't get what's replacing it for banking. Is there another IO chip being added to perform the banking? If so, why wouldn't the banking controls be put in the IO address range? It seems that checking if the address is $0000-$0001 would require a ton of logic gates to make work. My confusion is compounded by the responses to questions about putting VERA IO in the zero page. There have been discussions about it that have been dismissed without discussion (such as this thread). I feel like I get why putting VERA IO on the zero page is impractical (if not impossible), but the same reasoning I have would also apply to the banking controls. What makes banking different from the VERA interface? The only answer that makes sense to me is that writing to the banking addresses just sets the value in Low ROM, and the address pins of the RAM/ROM chips are being set by the Low RAM chip when accessing High RAM/ROM. This would also explain why it wouldn't work for VERA IO, as that technique wouldn't work there. However, I can't imagine how you'd get the Low RAM to do that without interfering with the CPU's Data Bus. I don't need or even want a massively technical answer, as I understand the design is being kept somewhat private for now, and I probably won't understand all of it anyways. I'm just wondering how this is supposed to even be reasonably possible.
  14. 1 point
    I think the color alone might qualify it for all three categories. I remember the first time my wife saw it; instantly dubbed it the Incredible Hulk. I was thinking about making it even uglier by wrapping the top in wood grain laminate. I run several pi's too. I think my favorite to play with is the OpenWRT, however, the one I put the x16emu is what I have been spending time with lately. Thanks for the reply! Have a great evening!
  15. 1 point
    Good. Sorry if I came off as a know it all or something, I just wanted to be sure you considered the option. Edited to observe that I lost track of who I originally replied to. pzembrod is agreeing with me. Regardless, I still hope I didn't come off as a know it all, just offering a suggestion to tide people over to support both emulator versions until it is no longer necessary.
  16. 1 point
    You are correct although I am disappointed that it didn’t run on belt buckles. Perifractic, X16 Visual Designer http://youtube.com/perifractic
  17. 1 point
    That's exactly what I'm doing: I'm treating each assumed bank registers separately, storing and restoring each independently of the other one, and setting them both to a desired bank when I want to access that bank. Half of that code is, of course, an elaborate noop, but one of the two halves should get the job done, and the two halves shouldn't get into each others' way.
  18. 1 point
    Sure! Odd, rare, and just plain bad computers are not confined to any specific decade. I have never even heard of a "Pi-Top" until now, seems like a neat idea, but sounds like it has some "issues". I run 5 different Pi's, but none in a laptop case, and I enjoy them a lot. lol Hey, we like having enthusiasts as well as the "just curious", or new!
  19. 1 point
    Can we add a more modern hybrid into the competition? I have had to fix this computer twice, since I bought it for my son to work on. 1. I guess when they developed the idea of the sliding keyboard they did not take into account the number of times someone would open and close it. The mini 8 pin ribbon cable which connects the keyboard to the driver board, over time fractures from the stress, and becomes an intermittent fault. 2. I also had to add a fan, which circulates air when the keyboard is closed, since their giant heat sink is starting to effect the plastic of the keyboard. Again, I guess they assumed someone would not keep it running for days at a time. 3. And finally, the holes which are suppose to secure and align the raspberry pi for its connection to the power/driver board are not spaced properly. Thanks to everyone for sharing their stories! I was beginning to think I would not find a group of people who had some of the same experiences as myself growing up. Nice to see so many enthusiasts out there. Have a great day!
  20. 1 point
    Or you use two bytes for the time being. Read $00 & $9F61, store them in temporaries, set them both to the desired bank so that it works on either version, then restore both.
  21. 1 point
    I used my school art/math lab's Apple ImageWriter with a color ribbon to print out a report cover sheet for my English class. I made it using a paint program on a IIGS - the height of technology circa 1991. My English teacher was Blown. Away.
  22. 1 point

    Version 1.0.1

    25 downloads

    This is a simple voxel demo written in 65c02 assembly. It has been tested in the r38 emulator. Press W A S D to move around. Press SPACE to quit.
  23. 1 point
    My dad bought mine for me when it was it's "full price" of $100 ... I went ahead and got the RAM expansion pack. My experience with that plug in RAM expansion pack made "64K RAM built in" an even bigger selling point for the C64. My biggest "never underestimate the incompetence of a 15 year old" moment happened in my mid-20s, when I got back from the Peace Corps and bought a C128D, and when I went to plug in my printer interface, I plugged the power tap from the datasette port in upside down. Now, there WAS a notch, so a datassette power tap COULD be keyed to make it impossible to plug in the wrong way, but the parallel port interface I had didn't bother to do that and relied on user competence instead. Needless to say, I fried the 8510 processor in the unit, which is tied directly to the datasette port. That is, indeed, "why" I brought a C64 to grad school rather than a C128D ... the C128D had been turned into a large and expensive monitor stand.
  24. 1 point
  25. 1 point
  26. 1 point
    I think it was my uncle that got my parents to see that computers were not just expensive toys, but actual learning tools that they could also use. Sadly, my parents never really used any of the computers we owned over the years. My dad played a few games on my C64 from time to time, but that was about it. Still, they saw how much I liked them, and I think they were just happy there was something I had at home that I preferred doing other than wandering around town with my friends, something I still did a lot of. haha I agree on the "never underestimate the incompetence of the 15 year old", I came close to, and successfully fried, my fair share of stuff back then. I look back on it now as mistakes I learned from. My dad was really good with electronics, but has very little computer knowledge, so he helped me learn the components he knew, and what they were for, and I tried to teach him how it all worked as a computer. Good times.
  27. 1 point
    It is possible I had some hardware defect with the cassette interface. I suspect the problem was either the cassette player I had at my disposal at the time, or my inability to fine tune the volume to successfully play it back. Never underestimate the incompetence of a 15 year old who knows very little about how computers work using a fire sale priced discontinued bit of hardware (I think my father paid $35 for it in 1983). Really, the more incredible thing in my mind is the price. $35 in late 1983 is about $90 today according to https://www.bls.gov/data/inflation_calculator.htm, which pales in comparison to modern tech such as a RPi.
  28. 1 point
    Mine had working cassette storage, so maybe you just had one with a flaky chip somewhere. But between the constant crashing when the 16K RAM was connected, the membrane keyboard and the speed of operating which was AFAIU due to using the CPU as the display chip so it only executed programs during the vertical blank, it was more than anything an explanation for why I opted for a C64 system when I had the chance.
  29. 1 point
    So stop using 640x480. Drop down to 320x240 and all of your problems will go away. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  30. 1 point
    My parents saw the computer as a toy, and to a degree it was. Restricting my use of it prevented me from discovering the art of programming well into my adulthood. I really wish learning basic couldve happened during my formative years. A friend had a c64 in his room and the only memory I have of us using it was a flight sim. We had computers at my elementary school but a course in it was offered only to the GATE program students. By junior high we had apple 2s but their use was limited to typing class. In high school we had a mac plus lab but by then I had developed a hatred for apple computers. Sent from my SM-T720 using Tapatalk
  31. 1 point
    Bonjour mon ami! Perifractic, X16 Visual Designer http://youtube.com/perifractic
  32. 1 point
    Another quick update. I really wanted to get the demotune working so spent some time working on that after I sorted out keeping track of the last instrument used and squishing a few bugs. It now uses 5 channels! (albeit only for a short bit). The first part is just showing the pattern changes, since you can no longer see those while the song is playing.
  33. 1 point
    I started on a TI-99/4A, then moved to Commodore, and of course Commodore won me over pretty quick. :) My TI was a gift from my uncle in 1981, and I was thrilled beyond belief to get it. My parents were not gonna drop that kinda money for something they had no idea if I would keep using... boy were they surprised. I spent every free moment behind that keyboard. From that point forward, they fully supported my interest in computers. Good times!
  34. 1 point
    Yeah, the membrane keyboard wasn't the nicest thing in the world to use. My only other computer experience up to that point had been several PET 4032 (I think) at my school, which I thought felt great. Then the TS 1000 which wasn't all bad, and it was a gift, so I hate to sound ungrateful. Then I bought my C=64.
  35. 1 point
    I never had the opportunity to own, or use, a TS 1000. Back then, and to this day, I really dislike "chiclet" or soft mushy keys and avoided them as much as possible. I was also not a fan of the smaller or pocket computers in general. Of course, much later in life I got to mess with and appreciate a lot more, like the ZX Spectrum, but that's as close as I got to a TS 1000. Still, I wish we had a computer "museum" in my area, I would love to play around with some of these systems I missed out on. :)
  36. 1 point
    My "worst" computer was a Timex Sinclair 1000. I don't know how rare they were in the US, but my dad bought me one knowing I liked computers (it was still a dream to own one at that point) he found on clearance for only $35 in the early 80s. I never ever could get it to work with any tape recorder, so it was a write only code platform with that magnificent 2K of RAM. A luxury by the standards of some computers, but yeah. He did pick up a 16K RAM expansion module for it too, but it was so flaky that the computer wasn't very stable.
  37. 1 point
    It takes the saying "comparing apples and oranges" to a whole new meaning, haha!
  38. 1 point
    Some really weird design decisions going on there .... this must be an incredibly rare machine.
  39. 1 point
    I love seeing all these other computers that I never knew existed! The TI99/4A, my first, and still a favorite. I never owned a Zenith PC, but I did see them around. Found it funny back then that a TV/Radio company was making computers. Then again, seems like everyone was trying to break into that market at the time. Just like in the 90's when Magnavox tried the home game console market. Never even heard of Orange Logic either. Sounds like neat little system though! That thing looks cool! It has that metallic copper industrial look to it, almost like it would not look out of place in a Star Wars or Aliens film set of the era. Thanks for sharing!
  40. 1 point
    Well, kinda yeah, but actually it's not that compact. It's slim, but pretty large and heavy. And PSU is enormous. You can check out some good photos here: https://www.computer-museum.ru/articles/personalnye-evm/967/ No, it did not have composite CGA, graphics mode was 4 colours only. My dad even had to solder special PCB and mount it inside TV to connect it to Poisk.
  41. 1 point
    My family's first computer was a TI 99/4A, followed by a Coleco ADAM and then a Zenith Data Systems PC clone. The first computer I personally owned was a machine by a company known as Orange Logic. it used a PIC microcontroller as a CPU, and the sound system consisted of an RCA 1802 and an 8-bit DAC, and the built in language was Chip-8.
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