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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/15/21 in all areas

  1. Hi there, My name is Wouter Spekkink. I stumbled into this project a few days ago. Sorry for a somewhat longish background story: My father used to have a Commodore 64 that fascinated me as a child, but of which I had no clue how to use it. Fast-forward to 2012: I started picking up learning how to write code, which was another fascination I had done little with. I learned some of the basics of writing code in C++, moved on to writing simple plugins for an open source project (Gephi; which is Java-based) and then to writing software for the implementation of a social-scientific methodology I have been working on over the years (not published yet, but if you're interested, see some posts on it on my blog www.wouterspekkink.org). Writing software and more generally mucking about with my computers has grown into something that resembles a hobby. I had a lot of fun making a switch to ArcoLinux recently and configuring everything just the way I like it. Now I was looking for something more substantial to tinker with, and I was reminded of my dad's Commodore 64. I asked him about it, and unfortunately it seems to be 'no longer with us'. I then came across the C64 maxi (which I then bought) and very quickly became obsessed with getting to know the Commodore 64 better and learning how to hack it. That's also how I (very recently) found the channels of 'the 8-bit guy', '8-bit show and tell', 'Retro Recipes', and others, and it feels like having found a goldmine. Just as a quick aside: I think the main reason why I became obsessed with the C64 so quickly is the way that its limitations (compared with modern machines) necessite a deeper exploration of how it works and how to make best use of it. I've never had that sensation with my modern machines, which are honestly highly overpowered for what I generally do with them. And then I came across this project. It took me about 3 cpu cycles to decide I am going to buy this machine when it becomes available. It is such a great idea! And then on a more personal note: I was born in the 80s so for me this is not so much about nostalgia as feeling that I have missed out on a awesome era of computing. My impression is that 80s-era computers stimulate exploration and learning in a way that modern machines don't and often even steer you away from. I'm at the very beginning of various learning curves, such as learning to write software in assembly language and how to actually take into account the limitations of your hardware when you're writing software. I have almost no experience in BASIC either, but my impression is that my experience with other languages makes BASIC very easy to learn for me. I have sort of 'skipped forward' to machine language because that just looked much less familiar (and therefore interesting) to me. I'm a lecturer and researcher in Public Administration in my everyday life. Wouter
    4 points
  2. Version 1.0.0

    52 downloads

    Another small intro. Sadly still no audio. If only it wasn't so painful to debug audio and if I had any sort of musical talent... Thanks for looking! Spinner.zip
    3 points
  3. Never pirated any piece of software, but oddly enough I did provide offsite backups (first on cassettes, then floppies) to many of my friends who did the same for me; obviously I had to test these backups often to make sure they worked properly.
    3 points
  4. Thanks! Yes, I found that channel last night! I also found some great resources on this page's wiki. You have a wonderful day too!
    2 points
  5. Glad you are here to have some fun! I am pretty new here too, so I don't have much to offer in the way of advice. Your story parallels my own experience and motivation for being here. Just wanted to say hello and welcome. If you haven't already found it, may I suggest: Matt Heffernan's Youtube channel on Assembly programming. Have a wonderful day!
    2 points
  6. The first game I ever purchased was Planet X3. It was the only game I ever purchased until Attack of the PETSCII Robots which has not arrived yet.
    2 points
  7. Good ol' dual-deck cassette boom boxes were everywhere back then - and to think how the RIAA howled that they enabled music piracy, yet it also enabled software piracy too! History shows that this didn't matter - people still got rich making music and video games anyway, piracy notwithstanding.
    2 points
  8. Version 1.0.1

    61 downloads

    This is a simple voxel demo written in 65c02 assembly. It has been tested in the r38 emulator. Press W A S D to move around. Press SPACE to quit.
    1 point
  9. So you're using cc65 and want to load a file, whether into system RAM or VERA. Here's how. cbm_k_setnam("petfont.bin"); cbm_k_setlfs(0,8,0); // // A word about cbm_k_load( destination, address ) // // The address value of cbm_k_load() gets you 16 bits. Of course, // VERA's addressing space is larger. So you DO have to properly // set the FIRST parameter to cbm_k_load(): // 0 points to X16's RAM. // 1 points to VERA $00000. // 2 points to VERA $10000. // cbm_k_load(2, 0xf800); // replace these with your target address...
    1 point
  10. I don't know about the rest of y'all, but back in the day, I was quite the little buccaneer when it came to my software library on my C64. I estimate that only 1:10 of my floppies were official game floppies, and the rest were Bonus brand single-sided disks having the write-protect notch cut on the reverse side using a hole punch. Fast Hack'M (also on a Bonus disk) stayed near the front of my organizer. Almost all of my games had loaders with better music than the ensuing game, plus some combination of raster bars, smooth-scrolling text (greets), or self-congratulatory paragraphs talking about how few minutes it took to crack this particular title / how many cracks the author had done, etc. Some of my fondest C64 memories include finding other games on floppies I'd copied while at a friend's house, or having a 'sleep-over' where sleep = hooking 2 drives to the computer and doing a "git clone" of each other's library. I never had a modem, though, or else who knows how many more boxes of floppies I might have needed...
    1 point
  11. Spinning Intro View File Another small intro. Sadly still no audio. If only it wasn't so painful to debug audio and if I had any sort of musical talent... Thanks for looking! Spinner.zip Submitter Yazwho Submitted 04/15/21 Category Demos  
    1 point
  12. Just linked a short clip of it because the whole video is more cringe than I can handle.....
    1 point
  13. Version 1.0.1

    15 downloads

    This is a simple quality-of-life bash script I wrote. It makes it easy to install multiple versions of the emulator on the same system and run them from any arbitrary place. I have a directory ~/x16emu where I then create subdirectories for each revision, e.g. ~/x16emu/r38 The r38 folder is just the contents of the release .zip file (x16emu, rom.bin, kernal.sym, etc) I place this bash script in the path (e.g. /usr/local/bin) and rename it x16emu. Now you can launch any revision by typing x16emu -v r38 and all other arguments are passed through to the actual emulator. Furthermore, if you want to use a custom ROM image and put -rom /path/to/customrom.bin , then the bash script uses that and does not send its own auto-generated -rom argument.
    1 point
  14. Love the introduction! I think a lot of us share your sentiment! Welcome and have a wonderful day!
    1 point
  15. Hello all. My name is Greg. I had a C64 back in the day. I typed all my college labs on it and printed it out with my MPS 801. One instructor asked me to get a new printer 'cause he didn't like the way it printed 'g' and 'y'... Got my 64 when I was in grade 10. I hacked it apart, installing a reset switch by soldering some wires onto the ground and reset pin of the card slot (I think it was the card slot). I put a drive number select switch and write protect by pass switch on my 1541. I had a pocket modem -- a 300 baud third party modem that I had to replace the relay -- it only ever did pulse dialing. I'm really looking forward to some nostalgia with this machine. Been fiddling with the emulator. Greg
    1 point
  16. Hi everyone, while The 8-Bit guys needs no introduction, we thought the rest of the team should properly introduce themselves! I'll start the ball rolling... I'm a husband & father of 3 (furbabies), & actor-writer with a love of retrogaming. You might have seen or heard me at Perifractic’s Retro Recipes on YouTube, and I've been making retro music since before it was retro! For the fantastic Commander X16 project I'm proud to be spearheading the launch of the design and branding, among other things. Here's what falls under that department, with the help of some other very talented folks: This website's creation and hosting Case design & manufacture Keyboard design & manufacture X16 Butterfly Logo design & implementation Licensing Commodore BASIC & Kernel "Just the BASICs" user guide Packaging design & manufacture BASIC screen visual design/logo... I'm super excited as David's vision of his dream computer comes closer to fruition and am proud to be a small part of launching things to help that dream come true. I look forward to chatting with you all here! Your friend in retro, Perifractic
    1 point
  17. Thanks so much! Welcome to the forums [emoji106] Perifractic, X16 Visual Designer http://youtube.com/perifractic
    1 point
  18. I'm Matt and I'm helping out with the boring tech stuff behind the scenes on here. My journey began with a VIC-20 in the early 80s, followed by a C64 and an Amiga 500 before being dragged kicking and screaming into the PC era in the mid 90s. And basically, it's all downhill from there, which is why when I saw David's video on his dream computer, I simply sat there with an open mouth, nodding along vigorously. Other than that, I'm the writer and producer of the Blue Skies Chronicles® series of novels and audiobooks. Give them a listen, people seem to like them.
    1 point
  19. This website is gorgeous. Excellent job!
    1 point
  20. I did absolutely zero piracy with my Tandy CoCo2 as I knew precisely zero other people that had one. So, I paid whatever price RadioShack dictated for all my software. Going into the PC era, there was so much available as shareware that I just went with that for the most part. If it was worth having a complete version, I could pick it up in my neighborhood Electronics Boutique. Having a Tandy 1000HX in the 90s meant that most software that could run on it was already pretty cheap, even for a teenager. Sierra still put out a version of King's Quest V that was compatible, using Tandy 16-color graphics and on 720k floppy disks. With Sierra games, I played them a lot and had to do a lot of disk swapping, so I made backup disks to play from, which worked great. I mentioned in a review on Prodigy (!!!) how nice it was to be able to run KQV from copied floppies and that was my first exposure to online scolds. The tut-tutting was VERY loud and DEEPLY felt by even suggesting that you could play the game without the original disks. Now, I don't pay for any software other than console games and Steam games made by my friends. Everything else is all open-source, unless it's paid for by an employer.
    1 point
  21. I found your Youtube channel a few days ago and that is how I got to know this project. Your channel is absolutely great!
    1 point
  22. Hi Wouter, I appreciate your view on retro machines. Mine slightly differs: I like both retro and modern machines. - retro machines for the total control you get over them, the direct to the metal programming and the limitations that breeds creativity - modern machines for the near limitless power they have: you can freely explore math and algorithms. The One Lone Coder channel illustrates this well. Like you I'm learning 65c02 assembly and it is clearly an unusual and interesting approach to programming. Have fun!
    1 point
  23. In my country there were so few licensed software, that in my early computing years I did not know about it. Pirates ruled the marked. I bought lots and lots of copies of software, music, movies without knowing or understanding it was all pirate. But even when I learned about it later, not much changed, because there was no choice. I still used pirate copies, bacuase I did not have other options. And yeah, we also made many copies at home...
    1 point
  24. I had a lot of copies back then, mainly from friends. If one of us got a game, we all got it, if we could figure out how to copy it. It's just what we did back then, we even shared some at school. That being said, it was rarely ever more than a few of us, and we did buy a LOT of games. lol
    1 point
  25. As an early to mid-teenager, I did the best I could at purchasing software. I had a paper route and bought most of my computing hardware/software myself (except the odd birthday or Christmas). But I also shamelessly copied software too, but I can't say I'm "ashamed" of it. In the day where you could blow $30, $40, $50 on software that sucked, and not be able to return opened software to the store, and there weren't really "demo" versions or even Shareware at that point. I'm sorry, I don't really feel bad at all about it; that could be all the money I made in a month or more. I picked and chose what I spent my money on and I copied the rest. I don't consider it taking any money out of the pockets of the creators because 1) I wouldn't have purchased it in the first place. and 2) I never resold any copied software.
    1 point
  26. Ahem let's just say I sailed many high seas, and that this screen was burned on my retina on the C64: Only when I earned some disposable income a few years later I could purchase more software but by then I already had an Amiga. At first though, most of the software library for that one was also duplicated from questionable sources.... so yeah, in retrospect, not proud of it, but everyone did it you didn't know any better as a kid. Also it was the only way to play things on the computer because we had almost zero $$ as a kid and my parents didn't support the hobby at first. All is good now edit: Double Hack'em is what we used mostly with dual 1541's to duplicate stuff while playing a game on the computer itself. Remarkable piece of software.
    1 point
  27. holy crap Strider that's some dedication right there, I never did that and just accepted my loss after a good cry
    1 point
  28. Update Looks like TYPE-A me has won out. I’ve ended up spending most of my time refactoring my code into a project and using better coding habits. I’ve almost gotten rid of all global variables that don’t absolutely need to be globals, and most modules are now moved into separate files such as bird.c/.h etc. The fact that it's been so long since writing the original code has ended up being a good lesson because it’s like I'm reading someone else’s code. There were plenty of What was I THINKING? moments. The plus side is: now that everything is properly contained within its own circle of functionality, it's much quicker and easier to make use of these things in the main program. For example, I was able to quickly re-task the scoreboard as a 2-byte hex debug output tool so I can see values during execution if I need to. I have made progress in the game though. The joystick works. I was able to get the title screen knocked out in very short (for me) time last night, now that my functions don’t use global variables. Most of that time was spent implementing the "banners" - the actual title screen game loop took less than 5 minutes. The cool thing was that I was able to make the banner's position controllable by the joystick, and the scoreboard showed the X/Y coords, so I used that to choose the spot on the screen I wanted, and then just wrote the value into my code. No need to change + build + run, then go - hmm - 2 pixels up? (change build run).. no - two more pixels. (etc.) I also stumbled upon a neat method to make sprite slots dynamic so I no longer have to think about which sprite is the bird or the scoreboard etc. Each object just uses the next available one in the order I render them. Thich let me do something cool - I made the bird leave trails of the last 6 renders by just altering which sprite it rendered to on each frame. That little 'demo' aside, the nice thing is I no longer need to keep track of which objects use which sprite slots, so it's faster and easier to add/remove things as I see fit in my main game code. I can put 8 scoreboards on the screen as debug outputs, showing various things if that's what I need to do, and I don't have to account for the sprite slots in my other objects. Once I get the basic flow through all of the game states running (which also means I need to draw a few more sprites), I’ll upload the alpha .PRG so folks can try it out while I implement sound and other polish I'm planning.
    1 point
  29. Most if not all of them are available via archive.org today... https://archive.org/details/compute-gazette That page ostensibly includes a link to D64 disk images as well.
    1 point
  30. I still have old college papers produced on a C64 (actually a 128 in C64 mode) using Word Writer 6 (or 5, I forget) and an MPS1200 -- actually a really nice rebadged letter quality high pin dot matrix. It really worked nice and was half the weight of my old DPS 1101 daisy wheel monster. Of course, I think like everyone I also did plenty in years prior using Speedscript after typing the damn thing in myownself!
    1 point
  31. Hi Guys, I am living in mostly in Czechia (a couple of month in Spain) and recently I have just found this amazing project, I found myself missing a lot 8bits machines, so I removed the dust from my Amstrad CPC, and reading forums somebody mentioned this project and I felt in love at first sight ! Amazing Idea guys!!!! Looking forward!!!
    1 point
  32. Basic Trigs, Logs, Exponents and most of those similar functions, and powers, are Taylor Series (not sure about Square Root) which approximate to those values. The BASIC has very little other than a table of the appropriate constants. You'd be far better off using fixed point arithmetic (say x 256) and a table. You only need degrees 0-45, everything else you can derive easily enough.
    1 point
  33. True. The only ones who never blow anything are the ones who are never doing repairs in first place.
    1 point
  34. David has posted a video defending his actions and why the IBM thing was not "really dumb" as you put it. A vast majority of electronics engineers agree. Please watch your language and remember the group rules you agreed to when joining.
    1 point
  35. Hi Commandos (is that the right term?), I'm the guy writing the Assembly Environment / Super Monitor. I've been posting releases on FB and Murray**2. I'm still plugging away, and will be posting new updates here, too! In retro, Mike Allison
    1 point
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