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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/26/21 in all areas

  1. Scott! Wowzers! That's amazing to think about! Of course, there's already a lot of this sort of thing in 'the other direction' in the retro computer community. I have to take great care not to be a jerk when I see someone post on REDDIT about how their brand new VIC20 game blows away anything that ever existed at the time the machine was 'in general use' and how the original programmers must not have been any good etc., etc. Of course their new VIC20 program was put together using a cross development environment running on a modern machine with more than half a million TIMES more transistors; repeatedly (and instantly) compiled right into VICE or whatever emulator of choice for testing. The graphics were prepared using photoshop and illustrator and other utilities (having a combined code size equal to many thousands of 1541 disks); and thanks to the internet, with the benefit of having access to code libraries and disassembled code from virtually every 6502 based game app demo etc ever made! And don't get me wrong I don't begrudge folks from using those 'best available tools' for the job. But its the smug and self righteous comparisons in which they credit themselves as better programmers than the folks from 'back in the day' that tends grind my gears. I wonder what their game would have looked like if they HAD used only the same tools as the people who were programming on the old machines in the 1980s, using simple assemblers, graph paper and colored pencils for the drawings, and (on the VIC20 at least) saving their work on cassette tapes (where just the 'save' gave you time to go out and get a cup of coffee). Geez. See what I mean? I can be a real "get off my lawn" old coot when it comes to that topic!
    3 points
  2. So, the Opening Ceremonies for the Tokyo Olympics aired this morning (in my region) and is about to be repeated. If you hadn't heard, the "Parade of Nations" sections where all the athletes enter the stadium in groups behind their respective flags, was entirely underscored with (arranged) video game music. At first I recognized Dragon Quest (Dragon Warrior in N.A.), Final Fantasy, and two tunes from Chrono Trigger, and two others that sounded familiar but I wasn't sure where they came from. I thought they had worked some video game tunes in with other music. But, later I was able to read that all the music in this section was from video games (all by Japanese composers, of course). The two I couldn't place turned out to be from more recent games, Monster Hunter (which admittedly does have a nice theme) and Kingdom Hearts. I haven't played those but I must have heard the music somewhere. The Japanese seem to have responded very positively to this. Japanese twitter was full of people declaring that the main Dragon Quest theme is Japan's "Second National Anthem." This isn't surprising: when Enix first started to make Dragon Quest, they hired mostly young up-and-coming professionals (like character designer Akira Toriyama whose "Dragon Ball" manga had only been in publication for about a year when he was hired by Enix). But the composer, Sugiyama Kouichi, was already considered an elder statesman of commercial music and was well-known for television music in Japan. Getting an older, established name attached to this project in a new media by a new company of mostly young people was quite a coup for Enix. The popularity of the DQ theme in Japan went on to far surpass any of his previous works. For me personally, hearing video game music in general, and some of these compositions specifically, as a kid was a big part of what inspired me to become a musician. I felt like video games were still 'nerd culture' back then and that my friends and I who spent hours playing them were living in a different world from the other kids who were involved in sports. So, hearing these tunes at a sporting event (the Olympics) actually felt really good; our worlds of interest are relevant to each other. It's also just nice to see Japan recognize that their video games are an important part of their cultural identity and of the way they present themselves to the world. This link has a list of all the game used (in Japanese): hochi news And, here's my best, quick attempt at a translation of the list. However, there are some character names I don't know, from the games I haven't played. Dragon Quest [Dragon Warrior]: Loto's [Erdrick's] theme Final Fantasy: Victory Fanfare "Tales of..." series: Sorey's theme Monster Hunter: "Mark of the Hero" Kingdom Hearts: Olympus Coliseum Chrono Trigger: Frog's Theme Ace Combat: First Flight "Tales of..." Series: The Royal Capital Monster Hunter: "Wind of Departure" Chrono Trigger: Robo's Theme Sonic the Hedgehog: Starlight Zone Winning Eleven: eFootball Walk-on theme Final Fantasy: Main Theme Phantasy Star Universe: "Guardians" Kingdom Hearts: "Hero's Fanfare" Gradius Nemesis: Act I-1 NieR: Song of Initiation[?] "SaGa" series: "Song of the Demon Bard" [??] (SaGa series medley, 2016 Orchestral arrangement) Soul Caliber: "The Brave New Stage of History" EDIT: Notice, none of the games included were made by Nintendo (though some were for Nintendo systems). So my prediction is, there will probably be a Nintendo-themed segment in the closing ceremonies.
    2 points
  3. Yes, the sprite data should already be in VRAM. The sprite attribute table at 1FC00 will point to the start location of the sprite data in VRAM. I found @SlithyMatt's sprite tutorial on YouTube very helpful.
    2 points
  4. Exactly! I once computed the number of disks that would be required to emulate a Windows 10 system on a C= 64 with 1541. Let's see, the computer I'm using right now, assuming we could even fit a CPU emulation in a C= 64 without having to swap programs in and out of the address space, would need 16 GiB for RAM and 951 GB for the SSD. So let's call that 902 GiB. I can store 166 KiB on a 1541 based on 664 blocks free (I'll just assume I read and write individual blocks rather than use files which would consume two extra bytes per block, and any overhead I can squeeze into otherwise unused directory sectors). So I'll need almost 5.7 million floppies just to emulate the RAM and SSD. Undoubtedly I'd need more to emulate other aspects of the system such as video RAM, CPU cache, etc. I wonder where I can find 5.7 M new old stock floppies? Or we could go really old school and use tapes!
    2 points
  5. I like that Mario Bros. clone. It reminds me of what I had posted in a different thread. Nintendo themselves did this with our version of Super Mario Bros. 2. The Japanese Mario sequel was deemed too difficult for the international market, so they took a game called Doki Doki Panic, and modified it to be the version of Super Mario Bros. 2 we know today. It's an interesting story. From Wikipedia: I do love how they add so many clones and ROM hacks just to get the count up. I mean, you know they are not paying licensing fees to sell the legit ROM's they are using, so why not just use all original games. I guess 620 in 1 looks better than 100 in 1. Still, there are hundreds of good NES games without the need for hacks and clones. lol All in all it seems like there is a good mix of legit ROM's in that NES clone for the price. Funny to see games like TMNT and others in a different language, even though they were also released in English. Being an import, it's fully understandable though. Also, that Street Fighter 2010 game, I loved back in my NES days! Played it a lot. Hard, but fun. I remembering being impressed by it's graphics. Good times. Great video!
    1 point
  6. I did a couple livestreams playing around more with the "620 in 1" NES Classic clone, and edited them into a single video: If you want to see the original, unedited streams, they are on my second channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNPJDAcKcAUYfemAMwqa56g
    1 point
  7. Given that the creation of a symbol file is performed by the linker, I'd assume the issue is that only exported symbols are listed. Try adding a .export for each symbol that you need the location of.
    1 point
  8. Ohhhhhhhh. OK! So I will at least want to write a C library for VERA sprite stuff. And so I can still think about one in assembly too.
    1 point
  9. https://blog.davetcode.co.uk/post/21st-century-emulator/ My favorite / most horrifying part: (just to be clear, they're not serious)
    1 point
  10. Google presented nice retro game as a doodle: https://g.co/doodle/99dkzef
    1 point
  11. You can use C-space variables in asm() calls with cc65. C identifiers are imported into assembly with a _ prepended to their names. So you could do this: char[12] onthefly ... asm ("lda _onthefly") This would be like &onthefly - I haven't tried things like asm("lda #<_onthefly") - not sure how sophisticated the asm() command is, but since it's part of the same software suite that is also the assembler, I imagine it's able to decipher that.... I used it in my IRQ handler asm("jmp (_systemIRQ)" where in C, systemIRQ holds the address from $314 at boot. I don't know where C put it, and don't care.
    1 point
  12. 16-bit rotations are easily doable without loops because the bit that rotates “off” the register rotates into the carry flag, and the carry flag rotates into the register. so say you have a 16bit unsigned variable held at myword, and you want to multiply by 4. ASL myword ROL myword+1 ASL myword ROL myword+1 Do it a third time for myword * 8. ASL always shifts a zero into the LSB. ROL shifts the carry bit into the LSB. (that’s why it’s ASL on the low-order byte) so to finish your formula, after the three shifts: LDA #$10 CLC ADC myword STA myword LDA myword+1 ADC #$FC STA myword + 1 This can be done more efficiently but I wanted to use the most straightforward methodology as the example.
    1 point
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