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kliepatsch

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  1. ah I see, nothing goes without saying which speed (or just assume it was fast) ... t'was medium in my case above, need to try fast as well. Edit, I tried
  2. Can anyone beat my 36.90 on "STEIL AUTOBAHN"? (well, I'm almost certain the @Johan Kårlin has set some decent records already?)
  3. this is really well done, congrats on this game! I am getting TrackMania vibes
  4. Nice! I like how from the instructions it is immediately clear what to do, but it's still challenging. After the first moments I knew I would somehow need to figure out how to set up traps, but couldn't think about it because it was too hectic signs of a good game!
  5. Yes, I have been there. That doesn't necessarily mean I understood that information in all if its consequences
  6. Thanks! I didn't know about the extra 65C02 instructions. Looking at them, I think they would rather benefit the keyboard polling code than the actual sound generation, unfortunately. The question is rather, if the game would run reliably alongside this I think atm the CPU usage is 70-80% -- so you would still have a C64 equivalent of computing power left for the game
  7. Version 1.0.0

    1 download

    I wanted to explore the possibilities with the PCM output. This tiny synth generates a sweet tone from three sine waves, coated in a thin shiny silver layer of aliasing. To spice it up, I also added a delay effect. You can play it with your keyboard. Use Z and X to switch octaves. I do not plan to follow this route any further, because the possibilities are quite limited with the X16. I am sure one could do better than I did, but the X16 doesn't have enough power to provide a whole lot of flexibility in the sound generation (at least with PCM). Find the source here: https://github.com/biermanncarl/cx16-tiny-pcmsynth Feel free to reuse the code for your own projects!
  8. Tiny PCM Synth View File I wanted to explore the possibilities with the PCM output. This tiny synth generates a sweet tone from three sine waves, coated in a thin shiny silver layer of aliasing. To spice it up, I also added a delay effect. You can play it with your keyboard. Use Z and X to switch octaves. I do not plan to follow this route any further, because the possibilities are quite limited with the X16. I am sure one could do better than I did, but the X16 doesn't have enough power to provide a whole lot of flexibility in the sound generation (at least with PCM). Find the source here: https://github.com/biermanncarl/cx16-tiny-pcmsynth Feel free to reuse the code for your own projects! Submitter kliepatsch Submitted 10/18/20 Category Audio Apps  
  9. Currently, the input stream from the keyboard is simplified by the KERNAL in a way that is optimized for text-based applications. By that I mean each keypress is only registered once (unless the key is held down for a while). This is nice for many applications. However, for games and other interactive cases (e.g. using the keyboard as a musical keyboard) it would be really nice to access data on which keys are actually held down (at the same time). Because I currently do not find a way to do this, I am asking if this could be made possible in the future? As I understand it, the routines that do the keyboard handling, are currently located entirely in ROM and not available for modification without replacing the ROM. I understand that for most games, a controller with arrow keys seems sufficient. But I suspect that opening the keyboard interface up would greatly benefit the X16, since a broader range of applications will be made possible. All the best, Carl
  10. Hi everyone, in my current project, I would like to detect key releases, or at the very least if any keys are pressed, at all. The usual GETIN only returns a nonzero value one single time during a key press (except the repeated ones when the key is held down for a longer time). It doesn't provide any precise information on HOW LONG the key is held down. Are you aware of any possibilities to get more precise (and possibly more low-level) data from the keyboard? Thanks in advance. Edit I've found this thread where they mention, that keyboard input is handled by the NMI handler. Since both the ISR vector, and the routine itself are in ROM, there is no way to get the actual data from the keyboard (without modifying the ROM). I really think that the X16 would greatly benefit from a more exposed keyboard interface.
  11. I did a little more research and it seems to be common practice to put the SYS2061 command in front of machine code programs. Not only on the X16 but even on the C64. Well, I think I can accept that it is like this for now, as I don't have a good reason to not make use of this convenient auto-starter Thanks @desertfish and @SlithyMatt again for the explanations.
  12. Thank you very much. I did the listing and got indeed just like you mentioned. To me, the 2061 still seems like a magic number. Where does it come from? With a hex editor, I see that the .PRG file is loaded at $801 and that this BASIC program is actually included in the binary file. Therefore it must stem from the assembler. I assume that there should be a possibility to define what's at the start of the file. But I couldn't find it anywhere in the config files for the X16 (I mean cc65 config files). Is this (i.e. the "SYS2061" at the start) the default behaviour if cc65 compiles for the X16?
  13. This may be a dumb question. In the assembler tutorial, the code starts at address $80D, which is in the BASIC memory that starts at $800, according to the documentation. Why does the program start at that address? To prevent clashes with the LOAD "HELLOASM.PRG" , which may still be in the BASIC memory? And also, how does the BASIC interpreter know, when typing RUN, where to jump? Thanks BTW for the great content to help beginners with setting up everything for Development on the X16!
  14. Here's a minimal working example for PCM for anyone interested: It should compute for a while and eventually create a short sine wave beep.
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