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Dmian

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Dmian last won the day on March 16

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About Dmian

  • Birthday 02/10/1973

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  1. I think if you look for “portable color tv radio” you can get some results on eBay... This model is a Contec, but there are other brands. Some are at reasonable prices. Edit: it seems that the most prevalent ones in the US are the Emersons and the GEs, but those don't seem to have VIDEO and AUDIO IN like the Contec, so your only option if you get one of those is using the RF modulator and the antenna connector.
  2. I wanted a CRT for my retro computers, but I didn’t want to deal with the weight and the size... so I found a 6 inches TV/radio combo for sale, that has video and audio input, and it was cheap! (€10, around $12). i’m really happy with my purchase, and thought you guys may appreciate it.
  3. I may be wrong, but I think there's still no public information about any PCB because there's still nothing final and things can change. So, creating any piece of hardware for the platform at the moment is not possible.
  4. I play Animal Crossing New Horizons daily (10-15 minutes a day). Played all the versions since Gamecube. Started playing the game back in the day because I read it was similar to Little Computer People... And the masterpiece that is The Legend of Zelda Breath of the Wild on the weekends. What a wonderful game. Not much other than that. Maybe I fire OpenEmu from time to time on my Mac if I want to play some old arcade, or old game...
  5. In recent years, one notable kit is the Little Bits. They were bought by Sphero: https://sphero.com/collections/all/family_littlebits i wanted to get one for my son, but used to be a little expensive when it was launched. I didn’t have any kit as a kid.
  6. I’m reading the book Ben Eater read to learn: Digital Computer Electronics, by Malvino and Brown. If you want to understand how the machine works, how the hardware is structured, it’s an interesting read. Then, you may want to learn 6502 assembler (something I wanted to do since I was a kid). I’m not there yet, but besides Matt’s excellent videos, and the infamous Commodore book, you have things like this: https://www.atariarchives.org/mlb/introduction.php or this: https://skilldrick.github.io/easy6502/ Hope it helps.
  7. Great job, Perifractic! Looking great!
  8. Randy is amazing! Both the VIC-II Kawari and the BMC64 are wonderful retro projects. And you can see he knows exactly what he’s doing. You can replace the SID, the PLA, the ROMs and now the VIC-II. The CPU you can kind of replace with a 65C02. Are there replacements for the 6526 CIAs, though?
  9. Oi brasileiros! Abraços from Spain!
  10. One of the problems retro computers have is trying to connect them to modern TVs. The standard nowadays is HDMI, a very complicated digital protocol, that’s quite complicated to handle (it was discarded from the X16 for this very reason). Well, turns out that if you have an RGB signal, there’s a chip that can take that and create and HDMI signal, it’s the CH7035 by Chrontel http://www.chrontel.com/product/detail/35 If you need to add HDMI output to a project, keep it in mind. I found it really interesting. Hope you find it useful.
  11. Hello! My name is Damian, I'm a 47yo Graphic and Web Designer and Front-end Developer from Madrid, Spain (though I was born in Argentina). I have a 16yo son. As a lot of you, I started with BASIC on a TI 99/4A aged 11, then on a Commodore 64 my father bought us. I also made a few things on a Timex Sinclair 2068 that my cousins had, and played on a friend's Commodore 128, and then an Amiga 500. Later in life, when I was around 20 I bought a second-hand Mac Plus, and I've been a Mac user ever since (kind of like Adrian, from Adrian's Digital Basement, I've have almost no PC contact, except in the professional space). I saw this project on the 8-bit Guy's channel, and was really happy that it got traction, because I've been thinking of something similar for a long time. My idea was called "Maelstrom Color Computer" and I even made a logo for it: But I also wanted to make a retro-computer with BASIC and instant-on features that included a case with integrated keyboard, in the line of the Home Computers of the 80's. The thing with this is that everything related to plastic injection is so expensive that I think it's highly improbable that such an idea can be made in the hobby scene. So, I'm just happy that this project is alive, and will follow it with great interest. Since I never learned to program in assembler for the Commodore, I'm interested in learning this time around, so I'm watching the videos by Matt Heffernan, and found the Easy 6502 site. I hope I can learn enough and make something interesting. I want to specially praise the work done by Perifractic with the logo, since I find it wonderful. I like it more the more I look at it. Kudos! Other than that, I can say that a few years ago I learned how to solder and taught myself a bit of analog electronics, enough to build my own guitar pedals (I already built around 35!), and I'm designing my own guitar pedal circuit (a combination of booster and overdrive). And also recently bought a Resin 3D printer and I'm planning to use it to help me create my own pinball machine, using the Open Pinball Project platform and guides. It's a long and difficult project, but I'm really excited about it. I invite you to visit my site (it's only a single page with a Javascript animation, but I think you guys may appreciate it): https://damianvila.com And if you want to know a bit about things I made in the past for other projects, I made a little page with a few of these works, that you can see here: https://damianvila.com/hodgepodge/ or go to my Dribbble account: https://dribbble.com/damianvila Thanks, and sorry for the lengthy introduction. See you!
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