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cuvtixo

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  1. and there was much rejoicing! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yciX2meIkXI
  2. Well, my sense of humor is intact, I hope you can tell. I'm doing okay, except for my sanity. Of all the things I've lost last year, I miss my mind the most. But really I'm fine. I just needed to vent a little. Thanks though! I did not expect a reply! Much appreciated.
  3. I am so jealous. I've wanted to say this for a long time, got a blue PostScript book in the mid 90s and never did anything more than glance at it.
  4. No, that's a H.P.Lovecraft joke. I did grow up and go to University in Massachusetts, though. Now I'm near Boulder, Colorado, to be nearer the Old Ones hanging out unemployed during COVID19
  5. No. This is a complete misunderstanding. Actually it looks like a rehashed argument about running software emulators in Raspberry Pi or Windows. This is not that argument. The problem with software emulators, apart from common lag issues, is that there are not individual components with their own timings and other specific relationships between components.This becomes very noticeable in playing games. They just never quite seem the same. FPGA emulation solved this. You get, or can get everything working as if the components are original. Now I only say this as someone whose played games on these, I don't have anything but a cursory knowledge of how it works "under the hood". The MiSTer Project, for example has "cores" for emulation, and these cores can be switched out for emulation of any core you wish. One place to look for a list is misterfpga.org/index.php?sid=2c9bcc6611465cd72a8a7fe97481e0fa or https://github.com/MiSTer-devel/Main_MiSTer/wiki/Arcade-Cores-List Don't just look at the "Arcade Cores", check out the list of FPGA Cores on the MiSTer Wiki on the right. (Note in FPGA world, there's a non-Mister FPGA core for a LISP Machine -not too shabby. I was impressed) Now, you can not only play nearly any game from the past on a MiSTer, but with the "feel" of the game, for under $400 You can spend more and get the correct CRT as well, if you're looking for a more "authentic" experience. Now, I assume the Commodore65 and Next Spectrum and certainly not the Vampire Amiga emulators are meant to be changed to emulate other systems. but I wonder if they could be. If they can't, that just makes MiSTer that much more insanely good. Now, "why not skip all this hardware nonsense", I think that's a very challenging question when it comes to FPGA. But as far a hacking any of it, you have to learn a Hardware Description Languages like VHDL or Verilog. There is no truly Open Source HDL yet, but that will probably change soon. And note, neither language has got much of the attention of the larger computer language community; they don't have the maturity or nearly the supportive infrastructure of Java, for example. Its often just treated as a hardware band-aid, as can be seen on this chat! But this ComandX16 project is going to scratch some hardware hackers' itches. And the video system being FPGA- as Adrian of Adrian's Basement pointed out, this can be used on just about any 8-bit machine to be a HDMI (or VGA?) adapter. I've been looking lately and these are often $125+, even the DIY kit: "Tandy 1000, CGA, EGA to HDMI, DVI or VGA Converter" on Tindie is $45 plus shipping. If the ComandX16 video board has the equivalent function on multiple vintage systems, that's a huge bonus. And if its updateable? Crazy good. But, this is essentially a hardware hacker project by guys my age. It's probably not going to be too difficult to emulate on MiSTer, and if it were a bunch of younger guys who could learn Verilog in just a couple months, I'd say do that. There's very little downside to FPGA. And if you really want to stick to hardware, try a Z80 computer, maybe the RC2014 project and its endless attachments. Even they had to solve the video issue by adding a Raspberry Pi Zero as a terminal, as a sort of "video card". And yes the RPi is several times more powerful than the rest of the computer, but nearly anything else would be several times the cost of the kit.
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