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Wertzui

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    It has some of the things I gripe on in BD clones, but wow, all BASIC!
  1. Just out of curiosity. Will there be any kind of printer support built in? IEC port printers? Or something more modern and available? Or none? Is the interface for it will be like accessing device number 4 or 5?
  2. My current development method is that I write the BASIC code in a text editor, and copy-paste the text into the emulator. So what if you could do something similar ON the hardware itself? The X16 appears to be fast and stable enough for that. Like, having a comfortable text editor residing in hight memory (with maybe some help with the line numbers and syntax color highlights), you can save a separate ASCII source file, and on command, it could plop the the code into the BASIC memory and you could test it, then jump back to the text editor. It would be great ...or maybe not, but I can see myself trying to get to somewhere with that.
  3. @x16tial Phew. What a relief! It would have been a pain in the eye to deal with such a flimsy API (let's call it that) all the time.
  4. @DusanStrakl So that's what I was doing wrong. When I first tried VPOKEs, I didn't write it in the proper format, and wondered why it gives me "illegal quantity error"-s.
  5. Version 1.0.003

    53 downloads

    A simple Morse code program. Written in QBASIC as a learning process, ported to various CBM machines, and now on Commander X16, because why not! It can translate from text to Morse, or from Morse to text. The input can be typed in, or loaded from a file. It has different modes of operation, in how it uses the signal marks. I have implemented 3 modes based on what I saw in different programs. The characters of the signal marks can be specified by the user. Sound output can be configured too. The character output can be saved to disk. It will work even if the output is longer than 255 characters (and also can be loaded back). Note: it only processes files up until it encounters a Carriage Return (PETSCII 13) character. Settings are saved too, but are not processed, as of yet. (Using the proper settings is vital for Morse->text translation to work.) (This is the first piece of program code I release anywhere )
  6. Scrubbly Morse Code Translator View File A simple Morse code program. Written in QBASIC as a learning process, ported to various CBM machines, and now on Commander X16, because why not! It can translate from text to Morse, or from Morse to text. The input can be typed in, or loaded from a file. It has different modes of operation, in how it uses the signal marks. I have implemented 3 modes based on what I saw in different programs. The characters of the signal marks can be specified by the user. Sound output can be configured too. The character output can be saved to disk. It will work even if the output is longer than 255 characters (and also can be loaded back). Note: it only processes files up until it encounters a Carriage Return (PETSCII 13) character. Settings are saved too, but are not processed, as of yet. (Using the proper settings is vital for Morse->text translation to work.) (This is the first piece of program code I release anywhere ) Submitter Wertzui Submitted 03/06/21 Category Misc Apps  
  7. On a side note, here is a weird bug: When there is a print statement (line 52) in the FOR I loop, the sound pitch wouldn't rise, it just prints the I value!
  8. The sound got fully implemented into the program. With key information coming from: -partially with the addresses from the VERA Programmer's Reference, -and partially from the tutorial on accessing the VRAM https://www.8bitcoding.com/p/vera-overview.html (Also hooray for the someone who made POKE to take hex values too)
  9. It takes the saying "comparing apples and oranges" to a whole new meaning, haha!
  10. Got a peep out of it now.
  11. @DusanStrakl I will keep an eye on that, but for the moment, the sound needs to be directly controlled according to a text string that the user inputs.
  12. I didn't own one, but might just aswell bring it up: the Hungarian-made Videoton TV Computer! 8-bit Z80 CPU, the architecture is based on an early prototype of the British Enterprise 128, but it had to be adapted to parts available in the eastern-bloc. It had a built-in joystick knob. It was mostly used a in schools. I didn't see it much in action, partially because the whole class had to share it one-by-one (our elementary school in the rural had ONE on them), and partially because it was very prone to failure and had to be repaired all the time. What I heard, before our time it was used for a faculty math class, but then someone in the education ministry ordered that there has to be general computing classed now. We were taught (or at least that's what they were trying) BASIC, and some form Turtle LOGO language. Then there were the Commodore Plus/4 machines. It may have been a flop in America, but then they were dumped into countries like Italy, Germany, and Hungary. The Hungarian education system bought many of them, and thus generally it was considered as a school computer (at least in more equipped towns). Our math teacher had one, and she was very anxious when she had to bring it in the school when the TVC was down. Oh, and the unsold Enterprise 128 units ended up in Hungary too for some reason, but I didn't see one in live. That one had 256 colors, stereo sound, and the sound capabilities are still debated about because very few software took advantage of it beyond a simple 3-channel square-wave PSG.
  13. @Cyber A compact IBM PC clone in a keyboard, connecting to TV? That's pretty unusual... and awesome! Did it use the much neglected composite CGA mode? With artifact colors? (altough I'm not sure PAL TVs can actually make artifact colors) The Videoton TVC had a similar style of expansion cartridges.
  14. In the '90s? ANY computer was my dream computer! We didn't got one up until the early 2000s. Until then, there was the school's Videoton TVC (just one!), the math teacher's Plus/4 (she had to bring her own one when the TVC was down), a friend's C64 (when the datasette was working). Then the school got a bunch of MS-DOS PCs in the late(!) 90s. Oh, and I sometimes saw a P1/Win95 PC in the office of my dad's boss (that was the one given to us later). Any thing else that played video games? A tetris handheld, my sisters Tamagotchi, and cheapo chinese Famiclones that popped up in our circles around 99/2000. That was all I knew in the 90s. Everything was fascinating but borderline out of reach.
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