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Wertzui

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Everything posted by Wertzui

    It has some of the things I gripe on in BD clones, but wow, all BASIC!
  1. Just out of curiosity. Will there be any kind of printer support built in? IEC port printers? Or something more modern and available? Or none? Is the interface for it will be like accessing device number 4 or 5?
  2. My current development method is that I write the BASIC code in a text editor, and copy-paste the text into the emulator. So what if you could do something similar ON the hardware itself? The X16 appears to be fast and stable enough for that. Like, having a comfortable text editor residing in hight memory (with maybe some help with the line numbers and syntax color highlights), you can save a separate ASCII source file, and on command, it could plop the the code into the BASIC memory and you could test it, then jump back to the text editor. It would be great ...or maybe not, but I can see myself trying to get to somewhere with that.
  3. @x16tial Phew. What a relief! It would have been a pain in the eye to deal with such a flimsy API (let's call it that) all the time.
  4. @DusanStrakl So that's what I was doing wrong. When I first tried VPOKEs, I didn't write it in the proper format, and wondered why it gives me "illegal quantity error"-s.
  5. Version 1.0.003

    61 downloads

    A simple Morse code program. Written in QBASIC as a learning process, ported to various CBM machines, and now on Commander X16, because why not! It can translate from text to Morse, or from Morse to text. The input can be typed in, or loaded from a file. It has different modes of operation, in how it uses the signal marks. I have implemented 3 modes based on what I saw in different programs. The characters of the signal marks can be specified by the user. Sound output can be configured too. The character output can be saved to disk. It will work even if the output is longer than 255 characters (and also can be loaded back). Note: it only processes files up until it encounters a Carriage Return (PETSCII 13) character. Settings are saved too, but are not processed, as of yet. (Using the proper settings is vital for Morse->text translation to work.) (This is the first piece of program code I release anywhere )
  6. Scrubbly Morse Code Translator View File A simple Morse code program. Written in QBASIC as a learning process, ported to various CBM machines, and now on Commander X16, because why not! It can translate from text to Morse, or from Morse to text. The input can be typed in, or loaded from a file. It has different modes of operation, in how it uses the signal marks. I have implemented 3 modes based on what I saw in different programs. The characters of the signal marks can be specified by the user. Sound output can be configured too. The character output can be saved to disk. It will work even if the output is longer than 255 characters (and also can be loaded back). Note: it only processes files up until it encounters a Carriage Return (PETSCII 13) character. Settings are saved too, but are not processed, as of yet. (Using the proper settings is vital for Morse->text translation to work.) (This is the first piece of program code I release anywhere ) Submitter Wertzui Submitted 03/06/21 Category Misc Apps  
  7. On a side note, here is a weird bug: When there is a print statement (line 52) in the FOR I loop, the sound pitch wouldn't rise, it just prints the I value!
  8. The sound got fully implemented into the program. With key information coming from: -partially with the addresses from the VERA Programmer's Reference, -and partially from the tutorial on accessing the VRAM https://www.8bitcoding.com/p/vera-overview.html (Also hooray for the someone who made POKE to take hex values too)
  9. It takes the saying "comparing apples and oranges" to a whole new meaning, haha!
  10. Got a peep out of it now.
  11. @DusanStrakl I will keep an eye on that, but for the moment, the sound needs to be directly controlled according to a text string that the user inputs.
  12. I didn't own one, but might just aswell bring it up: the Hungarian-made Videoton TV Computer! 8-bit Z80 CPU, the architecture is based on an early prototype of the British Enterprise 128, but it had to be adapted to parts available in the eastern-bloc. It had a built-in joystick knob. It was mostly used a in schools. I didn't see it much in action, partially because the whole class had to share it one-by-one (our elementary school in the rural had ONE on them), and partially because it was very prone to failure and had to be repaired all the time. What I heard, before our time it was used for a faculty math class, but then someone in the education ministry ordered that there has to be general computing classed now. We were taught (or at least that's what they were trying) BASIC, and some form Turtle LOGO language. Then there were the Commodore Plus/4 machines. It may have been a flop in America, but then they were dumped into countries like Italy, Germany, and Hungary. The Hungarian education system bought many of them, and thus generally it was considered as a school computer (at least in more equipped towns). Our math teacher had one, and she was very anxious when she had to bring it in the school when the TVC was down. Oh, and the unsold Enterprise 128 units ended up in Hungary too for some reason, but I didn't see one in live. That one had 256 colors, stereo sound, and the sound capabilities are still debated about because very few software took advantage of it beyond a simple 3-channel square-wave PSG.
  13. @Cyber A compact IBM PC clone in a keyboard, connecting to TV? That's pretty unusual... and awesome! Did it use the much neglected composite CGA mode? With artifact colors? (altough I'm not sure PAL TVs can actually make artifact colors) The Videoton TVC had a similar style of expansion cartridges.
  14. In the '90s? ANY computer was my dream computer! We didn't got one up until the early 2000s. Until then, there was the school's Videoton TVC (just one!), the math teacher's Plus/4 (she had to bring her own one when the TVC was down), a friend's C64 (when the datasette was working). Then the school got a bunch of MS-DOS PCs in the late(!) 90s. Oh, and I sometimes saw a P1/Win95 PC in the office of my dad's boss (that was the one given to us later). Any thing else that played video games? A tetris handheld, my sisters Tamagotchi, and cheapo chinese Famiclones that popped up in our circles around 99/2000. That was all I knew in the 90s. Everything was fascinating but borderline out of reach.
  15. I know that the sound specifiations are not finalized yet, but for the BASIC program I'm porting, it needs to have some sound. Nothing fancy, all needed is some single-channel beeping with pitch and duration control. And volume just set to max. I've already done this on C64, VIC, PET, and C16 (via register poking). For duration, I have a timer-based delay subroutine taken from C64Wiki, it seems to work on the X16 emulator too. Anyone to point me somewhere?
  16. Coming from QBASIC, I consider the 2-letter variable name space (and no numbers in the first spot, remember) to be a pretty harsh limitation. In some cases even it conflicts when the variable name resebles a BASIC keyword.
  17. As we are today in the lockdowns and we have to live our lives on our main PC, it would be a refreshing change to sit in front of something different and type away, no urge to open the Internet, no dayjob stuff, no stupid news and social media in reach.
  18. Do you also have renumber scan the code looking for GOTO and GOSUB and fix those? I've seen some that did, most didn't. It's gets better when the implementation has labeled subroutines. The BASIC versions on Plus/4 and C128 do fix the jumps, so I'm going by that, yes. And while I got some interesting errors when I first tried it, the mistakes were on my part. Sure, labels would be massivley superior. Altough it is supposed to be compatible with oldschool CBM BASICs? So fixing the jumps to line numbers would be a must.
  19. Over here, there was a time when it felt like these things will be used forever, even after the system change, well into the 90s. But in overall, people appreciated their household tech much more (scarce economy had much to do with it, but the mentality wasn't wrong). Until consumerism steadily took over people's mind and now they throw away their stuff with disgust as soon as the next trendy thing comes.
  20. Out of curiosity: who own the rights to the BASIC interpreters today? Microsoft? The Commodore brand holder? The Dartmouth college? Or someone random?
  21. I also wanted to ask this. BASIC V2 was one of the weak points of the C64, even compared to contendors of its day. Did not justice to it's capabilities. The C16 / Plus/4, then the C128, they got pretty good as far as BASIC goes. Not just with audio-visual commands, quality-of-life improvements too. Suggestion: please, add a RENUMBER feature!
  22. Yeah I know. This is the IQ Unlimited that pops up in searches. I'm actually not sure if it's the same architecture at all. The UI is more like GEOS with Windows 3.1 styling, all pixel-graphics instead of characters (and pretty slow too). But it's hard to tell by looking at the miserable LCD display that's built into the laptop form factor, and there is no other output. The sound is just a few crunchy, obnoxious cartoon sound effect samples. There's no way to open it up to see the guts (safety measure for children I suppose). Curiously, it has a printer port like on old PCs.
  23. I have picked up a VTech IQ Unlimited from a junk shop a few years ago. It was sold as a children's toy laptop in the 90s (at least this model, there are other IQ Unlimited branded machines that look diffenent). It has a dedicated mouse peripherial, a GUI, applications like a Wordpad-like text editor, a drawing program, and among others, even a BASIC interpreter. It can save files to an internal battery powered memory (and the battery is still not dead). From what I gather, on the inside it's an 8-bit microcomputer! Too bad it has a horrible non-backlit B&W LCD screen, a very awkward-feeling keyboard. And no external storage, which means no software support, and no way to backup the files you created.
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