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SlithyMatt

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Everything posted by SlithyMatt

  1. I used my school art/math lab's Apple ImageWriter with a color ribbon to print out a report cover sheet for my English class. I made it using a paint program on a IIGS - the height of technology circa 1991. My English teacher was Blown. Away.
  2. You can just treat the 10-bit position values as 2's complement, and it just works. So, $3FF is effectively -1, $3FE is -2, and so on.
  3. Are you building with "-t cx16"? Indirect absolute mode definitely works with jmp if you do
  4. I was going to call it the Chickenlips 32, but I'm afraid that @Perifractic would sick his lawyers on me.
  5. Thanks! Not yet... Pretty much this. The BASIC is no more efficient than the original Commodore BASIC 2.0. I was running Crazy Boulders at normal speed, so you should be able to get the same (or better) performance on the hardware.
  6. I had an AWE32 back in the 90s and it really was an amazing sound card. It was sad once synthesis stopped being a thing and it was all PCM all the time. I think a 68040 system with an AWE32 and VESA SVGA graphics would be a really nice system. You could run Linux or BSD and have a simple desktop environment. It would be great for gaming and simple productivity. It's what the Amiga could've turned into if Commodore wasn't so dead set on self-destruction.
  7. I put out a new vlog today taking a look at the most-downloaded complete games available right on this site. I'm looking to feature more X16 games and stuff on future episodes, so please give me some suggestions here on YouTube:
  8. Oh, I see. It's not clear in the programming guide how those functions work. They don't seem to add much value when you can just set the sprite attributes however you want in VRAM, and they appear to require you to load your sprite imagery into RAM before they can go in VRAM, rather than just load them directly into VRAM.
  9. Those are in the ROM at $FEF0 and $FEF3, not in VRAM.
  10. The Sprite registers are $1FC00 - $1FFFF. What API are you talking about?
  11. You need to store sprites somewhere in VRAM (just as you would define tiles) and then reference them in the Sprite Attribute Registers (https://github.com/commanderx16/x16-docs/blob/master/VERA Programmer's Reference.md#sprite-attributes) that are mapped to VRAM from $1FC00. You will also need to enable sprites by setting bit 6 in the DC_VIDEO register that is mapped to main RAM ($9F29). I am going to be making a video about this in a few weeks, but until then you may want to catch up on the underlying concepts of development that I lay out in my YouTube tutorial series: Of particular relevance, past the introductory concepts of assembly programming, are episodes 9 ("Hello, VERA") and 12 ("Tiles"). Using sprites will be an extension of that.
  12. You don't. You can use the host file system for most applications, especially if you are just loading the entire file into RAM or VRAM. It is artificially fast, but that can be beneficial for speeding up your development process.
  13. To clarify, in ROM, only the 128 normal characters are stored, and then the reverse ones are placed into VRAM via kernal software inverting the bitmap. You are 100% free to change any of the 256 character glyphs once they are in VRAM. ROM space is already dedicated to contain the entire 256-glyph ISO character set, which has all the diacriticals left out of PETSCII and there is a great deal of demand for that, especially for non-English programs.
  14. My HP 48G is still running and my daily driver. I just retrieved it from my semi-abandoned office, where it sat unused for a year. Got it home and cleaned the battery corrosion out, and now it's back at my side at my home office.
  15. Lesson 14: Mouse and Joysticks
  16. PSG Piano View File This is simply a single-octave piano that lets you select up to 4 waveforms to play simultaneously at the same frequency, at any chromatic note in the octave starting at Middle C. All controls are illustrated on the screen, with the number keys acting as toggles. Waveforms highlighted red will be played at full volume for any note. Code is available in the Lesson13 subdirectory of this GitHub repo: https://github.com/SlithyMatt/x16-assembly-tutorial You can see a demo of this program (along with a lesson on how use the VERA PSG with assembly language) on YouTube: If you are a member of my Patreon community (https://www.patreon.com/slithymatt) , you'll also have exclusive access to a video in which I give a complete code walkthrough for this Piano program. Submitter SlithyMatt Submitted 04/04/21 Category Audio Apps  
  17. SlithyMatt

    PSG Piano

    Version 1.0.0

    12 downloads

    This is simply a single-octave piano that lets you select up to 4 waveforms to play simultaneously at the same frequency, at any chromatic note in the octave starting at Middle C. All controls are illustrated on the screen, with the number keys acting as toggles. Waveforms highlighted red will be played at full volume for any note. Code is available in the Lesson13 subdirectory of this GitHub repo: https://github.com/SlithyMatt/x16-assembly-tutorial You can see a demo of this program (along with a lesson on how use the VERA PSG with assembly language) on YouTube: If you are a member of my Patreon community (https://www.patreon.com/slithymatt) , you'll also have exclusive access to a video in which I give a complete code walkthrough for this Piano program.
  18. That's on deck after the Virtual Boy port.
  19. I remember using the VMS version of WordPerfect in college. This was Google Docs before Google Docs! Running a word processor on a mainframe is far from a new concept, but just another trend cycling back. Once the advent of cheap student licenses for Microsoft Word arrived, it spelled the end of both mainframe-based word processing and using basically anything else on your PC. Right before then, I got the Corel WordPerfect Office suite (including Quattro Pro and a bunch of other tools) for Windows 95 and that's what I used as much as I could until the complete MS Office hegemony was complete. Thankfully, that's finally starting to break apart thanks to open source alternatives like LibreOffice becoming more mature.
  20. This is one of the more admired YM2151 tunes, from the arcade version of After Burner II. Sega used the YM2151 with a multi-channel PCM for most of their cabinets from the mid-80s through the mid-90s. This has sampled drums coming from the PCMs, but most of the instrumentation is FM. You could get VERY close to this on the X16, if you are willing to dedicate most of your banked RAM to FM instructions and samples. The samples would need to be lower-bitrate, but for drums that doesn't really matter as much.
  21. In short, the 6502 doesn't do floating point at all. You need to implement it with 8-bit integer math. That's what BASIC does. You could absolutely implement IEEE 754 as a cc65 library, it's just going to be very slow same as any FP implementation.
  22. It will still expect those files to have a two-bytr header, even though it's otherwise ignored.
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