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SlithyMatt

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Everything posted by SlithyMatt

  1. The bunny union doesn't play around.
  2. What about the bunnies that lay chocolate eggs? Are they only seasonal workers?
  3. That's an issue that plagues Linux, too. It has to do with some bad assumptions in SDL. What you can do is cut down the sample rate so that you may have lower fidelity, but less distortion and "wobbliness".
  4. Very cool! Any plans to add sound support?
  5. I think these days there are many more people "going commando" than normally.
  6. I could go full-on Proust recounting my technology memories, but I can try the Cliff Notes version first... 1978: I am 3 years old and my father brings home our first interactive video device: a Coleco pong clone with a light gun. Note I didn't call it a computer because I don't think it had any CPU, or probably anything really digital about it - the whole thing could have been analog video except for maybe a score keeper. My memories are pretty fuzzy as we never really played it much. 1982: In school I touch my first actual computer: an Apple II. I had played video arcade games by then and Atari 2600s at other people's houses, but this was the first thing with a keyboard and monitor, and a tape deck to load some math game. It was wheeled into the classroom on a little cart and I got a turn on it and was hooked pretty immediately. But they didn't bring it back very often. 1983: I get to use the Apple IIs set up in the school library and use floppy disks and start programming for the first time, in Logo! That would go on for the next few years at school as I would explore more about how to make computers do things, and not just play games. 1984: I get my first real game console: a Vectrex! They were being liquidated at Toys R Us, so I racked up a bunch of cool vector-based games and overlay films to go with them. After about a year, there were no more games available to buy, and we were in the middle of the Great Crash. Nobody was getting any new consoles, but one of my best friends had a Commodore 64. No crash over there! Pretty much the only vital game platform in the US between 1984 and... 1986: I get my first real home computer: a Tandy Color Computer 2 with a whopping 64kB of RAM! The CoCo 3 had just came out so the CoCo 2 had come way down in price. Not much to do with it except learn BASIC, so I did! It came with a great manual with a bunch of examples you could type in, which I spent countless hours doing. 1988: I get an NES and suddenly I had a huge number of games available to play that were a lot more impressive than what the CoCo 2 could do. So the CoCo, which was often connected to a black and TV, was just for playing with BASIC and using Color ScripsIt, the worst word processor ever. 1990: I get my first PC compatible: a Tandy 1000 HX. Now I could go to places other than RadioShack to buy software, and an even bigger world opened up, with great games available from Sierra and many other publishers. They drew me in deeper than most NES games, so as the 90s began I started leaving the 8-bit world behind. Until... 1997: My last year of undergrad at College and I am introduced to 8-bit microcontrollers, specifically the Motorola 68HC11. I had to learn to program it in assembly (not difficult after already using 68000 assembly for years and designing simulated CPUs) for multiple projects including my big Senior Project. When that was submitted in the spring of 1998, that was the last time I had done anything substantial with an 8-bit computer. Until... 2019, and I reach back 20+ years and dust off the 8-bit assembly skills to learn 65C02 and start making new software for the X16! It's been a great deal of fun so far, and I can't wait until I get a real X16! All through this timeline I built a career as a software engineer, until I got too good at it and people paying me to do things insisted that I had to be more of a manager than a developer. So this has really scratched my programming itch that has built up over the last few years of being what I call a PowerPoint Engineer. I also hope to get my kids interested in it, as well. My oldest daughter (who I have already started teaching Python to) says Chase Vault is her favorite game, even though it's a bit difficult for her. She has mentioned that her preference may have something to do with me being the developer. Cheers!
  7. Version R37

    74 downloads

    BASIC demo for using a sprite (now using R37 ROM) to haunt all the text it goes over. As seen on YouTube:
  8. BASIC Sprite Demo: Haunting View File BASIC demo for using a sprite (now using R37 ROM) to haunt all the text it goes over. As seen on YouTube: Submitter SlithyMatt Submitted 05/03/20 Category Demos  
  9. BASIC Sprite Demo: Eating View File BASIC demo for using a sprite (now using R37 ROM) to eat all the text it goes over. As seen on YouTube: Submitter SlithyMatt Submitted 05/03/20 Category Demos  
  10. Version R37

    83 downloads

    BASIC demo for using a sprite (now using R37 ROM) to eat all the text it goes over. As seen on YouTube:
  11. When new YouTube videos are posted, I will link them in the comments here.
  12. XCI: eXtremely Compact Interpreter View File XCI is a graphical adventure game engine for the Commander X16. It is inspired by past engines such as SCI and SCUMM, but designed to maximize the potential of the X16 and keep the games just small enough to run, and allow developers to create games without having to program in BASIC or Assembly. Learn more about XCI on the official GitHub page: https://github.com/SlithyMatt/x16-xci There you will find all the source code, documentation, and example code and templates. There is also a tutorial series currently in production on YouTube: In the downloadable ZIP file you will find the engine executable binary for the X16 (XCI.PRG) and two embedded archives of the Windows and Linux software development kits (xci.exe). The SDK is written in standard C and can be compiled to pretty much any modern platform, including Mac and Raspberry Pi. Stay up to date by watching the GitHub, and occasional builds will also be uploaded here. Submitter SlithyMatt Submitted 05/01/20 Category Dev Tools  
  13. Version 0.8b

    108 downloads

    XCI is a graphical adventure game engine for the Commander X16. It is inspired by past engines such as SCI and SCUMM, but designed to maximize the potential of the X16 and keep the games just small enough to run, and allow developers to create games without having to program in BASIC or Assembly. Learn more about XCI on the official GitHub page: https://github.com/SlithyMatt/x16-xci There you will find all the source code, documentation, and example code and templates. There is also a tutorial series currently in production on YouTube: In the downloadable ZIP file you will find the engine executable binary for the X16 (XCI.PRG) and two embedded archives of the Windows and Linux software development kits (xci.exe). The SDK is written in standard C and can be compiled to pretty much any modern platform, including Mac and Raspberry Pi. Stay up to date by watching the GitHub, and occasional builds will also be uploaded here.
    It is the Ur-Demo, the one from which all others have sprung!
  14. Upstate NY representing here as well! Welcome!
  15. I've been putting GitHub links in the descriptions and just uploading ZIPs of the latest builds. I tried to make it clear in the description that the preferred way to stay up to date was through GitHub, but I do plan on uploading at least every release build.
  16. Definitely a good showing from Denmark on my YouTube channel, but Sweden seems to love my X16 content the most in Scandinavia.
  17. This tutorial says they are supposed to be switched, too: http://retro64.altervista.org/blog/very-basic-basic-plotting-characters-screen-c64-and-vic-20/ I guess that means that my usual reference is not 100% correct. This OCR scan of an original CBM programming guide also says they should be switched, so it looks like there is no bug, for sure.
  18. Hmm... seems something is amiss, because the Kernal reference that I usually use says the opposite: https://sta.c64.org/cbm64krnfunc.html I wonder which way the C64 (or VIC-20) does it?
  19. Sounds like a bug. You should report it on the ROM repo: https://github.com/commanderx16/x16-rom/issues
  20. This video from Modern Vintage Gamer is a look at the graphics capabilities of the Game Boy Color, which to my knowledge is the last massively popular 8-bit gaming platform. It has some very interesting similarities to the X16 capabilities and I think some good lessons to learn for new development strategies.
  21. Have you tried the PLOT function in the Kernal ($FFF0)? If you set the carry bit, it should put the cursor position in the X and Y registers: sec jsr $FFF0 That's what the C64 kernal would do, but I haven't had a need to do it with the X16.
  22. Version 0.7b

    50 downloads

    This is the example game for the exTremely Compact Interpreter, or XCI, an adventure game engine for the Commander X16 inspired by earlier game engines like SCI and SCUMM. This game is only intended to show a potential developer how to create their own game, so it is extremely short and simple. To learn more about the XCI game engine and how you can develop your own game: https://github.com/SlithyMatt/x16-xci To play, load XCI.PRG and run. Then, when the menu appears, select "New Game". Note that this is based on an intermediate build after release 0.4b, from commit 33b29de, which will eventually be release 0.5b. See the latest demo on YouTube:
  23. Version 0.2.3b

    67 downloads

    An implementation of Tic Tac Toe using the XCI game engine. Follow the development on GitHub: https://github.com/SlithyMatt/xci-tictactoe To learn more about the XCI game engine and how you can develop your own game: https://github.com/SlithyMatt/x16-xci To play, load XCI.PRG and run. Then, when the menu appears, select "New Game". See a demo with a little explanation on YouTube:
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