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martinot

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Everything posted by martinot

  1. I have two oscillicopes from Keysight (their cheapest series); one 2 ch 200 MHz scope and one 4 ch 70 MHz scope. Both have build in AWG which I like and think is very useful. InfiniiVision 1000 X‑Series Oscilloscopes | Keysight For DMM I have several Fluke hand helds (industry standard) and Brymen (just as good as Fluke, but for 1/3 of the price). I also have a current clamp from Fluke and one from Appa. Brymen – BRYMEN Technology Corporation For small portable pocket DMM I have a Sanwa PM300 and a Kyoritsu KEW 1019R. Love them both! For soldering I have an old Ersa and an even old Pace solder station, but they will soon be complemented with a new JBC CDEB. CDEB - Soldering-Assistant Station (jbctools.com)
  2. If that is true, why does it say "Copyright © 2022 8-Bit Productions LLC. All rights reserved." on the home page? This doeas not compute (if it is a fan based site, and not any official site by David and his company 8-Bit Production).
  3. Love RPL, RPN and all HP calclulators! Fantastically great devices, 10x ahead of TI and Casio!
  4. Tyan Tiger 100 Loved my dual Slot 1 machine with Intel 440BX chipset and SMP hacked dual Celeron 300A overklocked to 450 MHz. 2 x 450 MHz CPU in 1998 for a small amount of money (for what you got) thanks to creative hacking/patching och overclocking.
  5. Well, I personally think we pure retro enthusiats can see beyond the religious wars and appreciate all nice 8-bit machines for what they are. I never had any Spectrum as young, and neither any Commodore machine, but the Spectrum Next is an really awesome new 8-bit retro machine!
  6. Yes, at least on my Apple II machines it is Apple logo keys. Love them! Personally I would have liked Apple to continue with the apple-symbols instead of the ⌘ on my macs.
  7. Can not wait for mine! It is really such a fantastic little extremly well made retro machine!
  8. I agree. I think one could possibly also add the Foenix computers. But are they really compatible with each other, or do they suffer from less software due to too many different hardware configurations?
  9. Agree, but we do not know the circumstances. Remember that this forum would have been deleted if it not had been for extentended support from @Perifractic and voluntary members. David and 8-bit prodcutions seems to have zero interest in the forum and this site. It is all Facebook.
  10. Perhaps admins could move this thread to the new "Home Commander X16 Forums Hobbies and Interests YouTube/Podcast talk" to get that forum going? Ping @TomXP411
  11. Waiting for the native version for Apple IIGS that takes advatage of it sounds and graphics!
  12. I agree! @Perifractic did a fantastic job with this site and it is very kind of him to fund yet another year of license and operation cost from his own pockets, and nice to see that other voluntary members will take over and not let it die (which I think is what would have happend otherwise as 8-Bit Productions LLC has zero interest in it). This is the best 8-bit retro computer forum. Thanks for keeping it a live and giving it an extented future!
  13. Not to take anything away from David, but I was under the impression that it has been Perifractic that has paid 100% for this site, forum and forum software.
  14. I liked and used Windows from start. Started with Windows 1.01, 2.0, 2.11 etc. before it generally took of in the market with 3.0 and 3.1. That said it was never any good OS or foundation with DOS in the bottom. It was co-operative mutitasking (each application had to work 100% and voluntary give up with CPU with a message passing scheme), and no memory protection (a bad pointer in just one application could corrupt any part of memory, and bring the whole system down). Eventually I got tired of all the crashes in DOS/Win, that I moved to OS/2 and (after using Unix at school) FreeBSD. They where much more stable OS (except that OS/2 desktop WPS was quite buggy, and OS/2 could also get unresponsive to input through the SIQ, the single input message que). The problem with me running OS/2 and FreeBSD was lack of software. Later OS/2 could run some Win 3.0-applications, but the compatibility where never perfect. I was so happy when Microsoft announced that they woud ditch the old DOS/Win line, and introduce a new OS/2 3.0 aka OS/2 NT, and later (after officially breaking up the co-operation with IBM) Windows NT (they changed the desktop and user interface from OS/2 style to Win3-style). It was quite unfinsihed and slow when I started to beta test NT 3.1 (or if it was even before pre-beta versions) as I got an early access to that from Microsoft. It was quite memory heavy in the first release of Windows NT 3.1 version, but got very good in Windows NT 3.5 version in 1994. When Win95 got released in 1995 I saw no idea to run that as my main OS. I did install it for dual boot (just like I had with DOS previously), but just purely for running some games. With NT 3.51 in late 1995 it got even better (and full support for running the additional APIs that Win95 had extended the Win32 API with). Now I could run Word, Excel, Photoshop, etc. in pure 32-bit versions on a stable working system. Great stuff!
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