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Found 20 results

  1. Version 0.0.3

    11 downloads

    I have been playing with the VERA chip in assembly, and have come up with a cheeky little demo screen that is reminiscent of some 80s demos I can remember as a kid. No music or fancy interactive stuff, but some of you might find it amusing. Warning: As a GP I feel I ought to point out this demo contains flashing / strobing effects! Thanks to the excellent tutorials of SlithyMatt - Commander X16™ Community, especially the latest one demystifying the VERA chip. I have used a lot of his code from the latest tutorial to create this demo.
  2. VERA Demo Screen written in assembly View File I have been playing with the VERA chip in assembly, and have come up with a cheeky little demo screen that is reminiscent of some 80s demos I can remember as a kid. No music or fancy interactive stuff, but some of you might find it amusing. Warning: As a GP I feel I ought to point out this demo contains flashing / strobing effects! Thanks to the excellent tutorials of SlithyMatt - Commander X16™ Community, especially the latest one demystifying the VERA chip. I have used a lot of his code from the latest tutorial to create this demo. Submitter gavinhaslehurst Submitted 02/24/21 Category Demos  
  3. Version 0.0.4

    43 downloads

    This is a quick demo of a 2D graphics library I've been working on recently. It's written in assembler, and aims to make life a bit easier when it comes to drawing vector graphics. You can define individual polygons which can be moved about and rotated. The source code looks fairly daunting, but when it comes down to it, building, transforming and rendering the polygons is very straightforward. Hopefully this will form the basis of a game at some point soon. (Perhaps an Asteroids clone?) Once I sink my teeth into interrupt handling, I should be able to "vsync" everything so it's flicker-free. All comments and suggestions welcome! Short screen capture of this demo on YouTube (featuring my tunez!!): Commander X16 Demo - Vector Graphics in 6502 Assembly - YouTube WARNING: For those who are sensitive to flickering/strobing, please be aware that this may cause problems for you. -- See below for a quick preview of the game I'm working on, retro flickering and all!
  4. Assembly Vector Graphics Demo View File This is a quick demo of a 2D graphics library I've been working on recently. It's written in assembler, and aims to make life a bit easier when it comes to drawing vector graphics. You can define individual polygons which can be moved about and rotated. The source code looks fairly daunting, but when it comes down to it, building, transforming and rendering the polygons is very straightforward. Hopefully this will form the basis of a game at some point soon. (Perhaps an Asteroids clone?) Once I sink my teeth into interrupt handling, I should be able to "vsync" everything so it's flicker-free. All comments and suggestions welcome! Short screen capture of this demo on YouTube (featuring my tunez!!): Commander X16 Demo - Vector Graphics in 6502 Assembly - YouTube WARNING: For those who are sensitive to flickering/strobing, please be aware that this may cause problems for you. -- See below for a quick preview of the game I'm working on, retro flickering and all! Submitter gavinhaslehurst Submitted 02/03/21 Category Demos  
  5. Hi All, I’m considering how to include a simple particle system in an X16 game - eg for explosions, with each particle being a single pixel. I can’t find any examples of how to do this (assembly). Does anyone have any suggestions or links? Many thanks T
  6. Version 0.6

    45 downloads

    Here is the Mandelbrot version of my Julia Set program, coded in assembly. Again, many thanks to the forum users here for their guidance, as well as the many YouTubers with their excellent tutorials on 6502 assembly language. It's a lot faster than the BASIC version, but nevertheless, benefits from being run in warp mode. Now in colour, with thanks to: VERA Overview (8bitcoding.com) NEW VERSION NOW WITH MOUSE CONTROLS! When the image has finished rendering, click the left mouse on the area of the screen you wish to zoom in to. To change the detail settings (cycle between Low, Med, High) click the right mouse button. Poke around in the old version... Try copying and pasting the following groups of POKEs to explore further (not all at once, just each paragraph in turn!): POKE $D6B,$19:POKE $D6A,$64:REM FX=6500 POKE $D6D,$13:POKE $D6C,$54:REM FY=4948 POKE $D6E,$00:POKE $D6F,$FF:REM FX=POS,FY=NEG POKE $D7B,$00:POKE $D7A,$01:REM STEP=1 POKE $D7C,$FF:REM ITERATIONS=255 SYS2061 POKE $D6B,$0F:POKE $D6A,$A0:REM FX=4000 POKE $D6D,$00:POKE $D6C,$00:REM FY=0 POKE $D6E,$FF:POKE $D6F,$FF:REM FX=NEG,FY=NEG POKE $D7B,$01:POKE $D7A,$F4:REM STEP=500 POKE $D7C,$FF:REM ITERATIONS=255 SYS2061 POKE $D6B,$0F:POKE $D6A,$878:REM FX=3960 POKE $D6D,$03:POKE $D6C,$E8:REM FY=1000 POKE $D6E,$FF:POKE $D6F,$FF:REM FX=NEG,FY=NEG POKE $D7B,$00:POKE $D7A,$32:REM STEP=50 POKE $D7C,$FF:REM ITERATIONS=255 SYS2061 To use the POKES above in the web emulator, first click the X in the top right corner of the web emulator. Paste the POKES above that you want to use in to the text field to the left, replacing what's already in there, then click the Run button. Individual addresses that can be poked: $D6A 30 75 .word 30000 ; FX $D6C A8 61 .word 25000 ; FY $D6E FF .byte $ff ; FX SIGN ff = negative $D6F FF .byte $ff ; FY SIGN ff = negative $D7A A8 61 .word 25000 ; STEP (lower=higher zoom) $D7C 10 .byte $10 ; ITERATIONS Old poke codes for the colour PETSCII version: step: POKE $0D3D e.g. 50 for a step of 0.05 (smaller number, higher zoom) iterations: POKE $0D3F e.g. 30 iterations about right, higher = slower start x: POKE $0D2F, normally 8 (for -0.8) - nicely centred at low zoom start y: POKE $0D31, normally 12 (for -1.2) - again centred at low zoom Old poke codes for the PETSCII version: step: POKE $0cff e.g. 50 for a step of 0.05 (smaller number, higher zoom) iterations: POKE $0d01 e.g. 30 iterations about right, higher = slower start x: POKE $0cf1, normally 8 (for -0.8) - nicely centred at low zoom start y: POKE $0cf3, normally 12 (for -1.2) - again centred at low zoom You Tube video of this in action: Commander X16 - 6502 assembly demo - Mandelbrot set - YouTube Commander X16 - Fractal Zoom Demo - 6502 Assembly - YouTube
  7. Version 1.0.1

    28 downloads

    This demo program provides an overview of what the vera card can do in terms of the different configurations in text mode, tile mode, and bitmap modes. The demo is nothing really fancy, but the workhorse underneath is the new API library (veralib.c and veralib.h, conio-cx16.c etc. ) that allows to configure and control the vera card of the CX16 using the kickc compiler of Jesper Gravgaard: camelot / kickc · GitLab. The veralib library and source code of this demo program has become an integral part of the compiler and test programs, and can be downloaded also from src/test/kc/examples/cx16/cx16-vera.c · CX16_VERA · Sven Van de Velde / kickc · GitLab. If you're a C-programmer, and you're interested in using this library, please beware that this is still work in progress. However, if you're motivated to try it out, i'm really interested to get feedback on this c-library to understand if the API is useful and clear. Feel free to try out the program, by running it in an emulator in windows; the mobile phone emulators won't be able to run this program properly because the keyboard is needed to run this. More features are planned to be added. One of the features planned is to provide mouse support, so it can be run using the android emulators too. kind regards, Sven
  8. Vera Modes - Demo View File This demo program provides an overview of what the vera card can do in terms of the different configurations in text mode, tile mode, and bitmap modes. The demo is nothing really fancy, but the workhorse underneath is the new API library (veralib.c and veralib.h, conio-cx16.c etc. ) that allows to configure and control the vera card of the CX16 using the kickc compiler of Jesper Gravgaard: camelot / kickc · GitLab. The veralib library and source code of this demo program has become an integral part of the compiler and test programs, and can be downloaded also from src/test/kc/examples/cx16/cx16-vera.c · CX16_VERA · Sven Van de Velde / kickc · GitLab. If you're a C-programmer, and you're interested in using this library, please beware that this is still work in progress. However, if you're motivated to try it out, i'm really interested to get feedback on this c-library to understand if the API is useful and clear. Feel free to try out the program, by running it in an emulator in windows; the mobile phone emulators won't be able to run this program properly because the keyboard is needed to run this. More features are planned to be added. One of the features planned is to provide mouse support, so it can be run using the android emulators too. kind regards, Sven Submitter svenvandevelde Submitted 01/23/21 Category Graphics Apps  
  9. Mandelbrot Assembly Demo View File Here is the Mandelbrot version of my Julia Set program, coded in assembly. Again, many thanks to the forum users here for their guidance, as well as the many YouTubers with their excellent tutorials on 6502 assembly language. It's a lot faster than the BASIC version, but nevertheless, benefits from being run in warp mode. Now in colour, with thanks to: VERA Overview (8bitcoding.com) NEW VERSION NOW WITH MOUSE CONTROLS! When the image has finished rendering, click the left mouse on the area of the screen you wish to zoom in to. To change the detail settings (cycle between Low, Med, High) click the right mouse button. Poke around in the old version... Try copying and pasting the following groups of POKEs to explore further (not all at once, just each paragraph in turn!): POKE $D6B,$19:POKE $D6A,$64:REM FX=6500 POKE $D6D,$13:POKE $D6C,$54:REM FY=4948 POKE $D6E,$00:POKE $D6F,$FF:REM FX=POS,FY=NEG POKE $D7B,$00:POKE $D7A,$01:REM STEP=1 POKE $D7C,$FF:REM ITERATIONS=255 SYS2061 POKE $D6B,$0F:POKE $D6A,$A0:REM FX=4000 POKE $D6D,$00:POKE $D6C,$00:REM FY=0 POKE $D6E,$FF:POKE $D6F,$FF:REM FX=NEG,FY=NEG POKE $D7B,$01:POKE $D7A,$F4:REM STEP=500 POKE $D7C,$FF:REM ITERATIONS=255 SYS2061 POKE $D6B,$0F:POKE $D6A,$878:REM FX=3960 POKE $D6D,$03:POKE $D6C,$E8:REM FY=1000 POKE $D6E,$FF:POKE $D6F,$FF:REM FX=NEG,FY=NEG POKE $D7B,$00:POKE $D7A,$32:REM STEP=50 POKE $D7C,$FF:REM ITERATIONS=255 SYS2061 To use the POKES above in the web emulator, first click the X in the top right corner of the web emulator. Paste the POKES above that you want to use in to the text field to the left, replacing what's already in there, then click the Run button. Individual addresses that can be poked: $D6A 30 75 .word 30000 ; FX $D6C A8 61 .word 25000 ; FY $D6E FF .byte $ff ; FX SIGN ff = negative $D6F FF .byte $ff ; FY SIGN ff = negative $D7A A8 61 .word 25000 ; STEP (lower=higher zoom) $D7C 10 .byte $10 ; ITERATIONS Old poke codes for the colour PETSCII version: step: POKE $0D3D e.g. 50 for a step of 0.05 (smaller number, higher zoom) iterations: POKE $0D3F e.g. 30 iterations about right, higher = slower start x: POKE $0D2F, normally 8 (for -0.8) - nicely centred at low zoom start y: POKE $0D31, normally 12 (for -1.2) - again centred at low zoom Old poke codes for the PETSCII version: step: POKE $0cff e.g. 50 for a step of 0.05 (smaller number, higher zoom) iterations: POKE $0d01 e.g. 30 iterations about right, higher = slower start x: POKE $0cf1, normally 8 (for -0.8) - nicely centred at low zoom start y: POKE $0cf3, normally 12 (for -1.2) - again centred at low zoom You Tube video of this in action: Commander X16 - 6502 assembly demo - Mandelbrot set - YouTube Commander X16 - Fractal Zoom Demo - 6502 Assembly - YouTube Submitter gavinhaslehurst Submitted 01/17/21 Category Demos  
  10. Version 0.0.1

    4 downloads

    Here is my work in progress Julia Set demo! I wrote this in BASIC a couple of weeks ago when starting out on the Commander X16 journey. Since then, I have been trying to learn 6502 assembler. This is the result so far! After wrestling with floating point arithmetic (see my other posts!) I have finally managed to get something working. At the moment, the output is PETSCII, but all being well there will be a graphical version of this in the pipeline. Feel free to muck about with the code. It's probably not written very well, but I have only been doing this for a couple of weeks (and despite being badly written, it's much faster than the BASIC version!) Many thanks to all the experienced forum users who commented on my previous posts to help guide me through this process, as well as the many YouTubers who posted tutorials about how to program the 6502. Watch this space for updates! Some things you can poke around in to change the parameters: POKE $0D30, X -- change the REAL component (this is passed as an integer but can be divided by ten a number of times to achieve smaller numbers - see below) POKE $0D36, X -- the number of times to divide the REAL component by 10 (in order to get around the lack of FIN in the Kernal at present) POKE $0D34, $00 -- make the REAL component positive POKE $0D34, $FF -- make the REAL component negative POKE $0D32, X -- change the IMAG component (this is passed as an integer but can be divided by ten a number of times to achieve smaller numbers - see below) POKE $0D37, X -- the number of times to divide the IMAG component by 10 (in order to get around the lack of FIN in the Kernal at present) POKE $0D35, $00 -- make the IMAG component positive POKE $0D35, $FF -- make the IMAG component negative
  11. Julia Set Assembly Demo View File Here is my work in progress Julia Set demo! I wrote this in BASIC a couple of weeks ago when starting out on the Commander X16 journey. Since then, I have been trying to learn 6502 assembler. This is the result so far! After wrestling with floating point arithmetic (see my other posts!) I have finally managed to get something working. At the moment, the output is PETSCII, but all being well there will be a graphical version of this in the pipeline. Feel free to muck about with the code. It's probably not written very well, but I have only been doing this for a couple of weeks (and despite being badly written, it's much faster than the BASIC version!) Many thanks to all the experienced forum users who commented on my previous posts to help guide me through this process, as well as the many YouTubers who posted tutorials about how to program the 6502. Watch this space for updates! Some things you can poke around in to change the parameters: POKE $0D30, X -- change the REAL component (this is passed as an integer but can be divided by ten a number of times to achieve smaller numbers - see below) POKE $0D36, X -- the number of times to divide the REAL component by 10 (in order to get around the lack of FIN in the Kernal at present) POKE $0D34, $00 -- make the REAL component positive POKE $0D34, $FF -- make the REAL component negative POKE $0D32, X -- change the IMAG component (this is passed as an integer but can be divided by ten a number of times to achieve smaller numbers - see below) POKE $0D37, X -- the number of times to divide the IMAG component by 10 (in order to get around the lack of FIN in the Kernal at present) POKE $0D35, $00 -- make the IMAG component positive POKE $0D35, $FF -- make the IMAG component negative Submitter gavinhaslehurst Submitted 01/17/21 Category Demos  
  12. Version 0.0.1

    12 downloads

    This is a quick and dirty Julia set demo written in Commander X16 BASIC. It generates a random Julia set each time it is run. I strongly suggest using the emulator's -warp option to speed things up a bit! Enjoy the fractal action!
  13. Julia Set Demo View File This is a quick and dirty Julia set demo written in Commander X16 BASIC. It generates a random Julia set each time it is run. I strongly suggest using the emulator's -warp option to speed things up a bit! Enjoy the fractal action! Submitter gavinhaslehurst Submitted 01/07/21 Category Demos  
  14. Version 0.0.2

    20 downloads

    This is a quick and dirty Mandelbrot set demo written in Commander X16 BASIC. I strongly suggest using the emulator's -warp option to speed things up a bit! I plan to make this a bit more user friendly, and include more options for zooming, changing colours etc. But for now, enjoy the fractal action!
  15. Mandelbrot Basic Demo View File This is a quick and dirty Mandelbrot set demo written in Commander X16 BASIC. I strongly suggest using the emulator's -warp option to speed things up a bit! I plan to make this a bit more user friendly, and include more options for zooming, changing colours etc. But for now, enjoy the fractal action! Submitter gavinhaslehurst Submitted 01/07/21 Category Demos  
  16. Hello people, I have been doing some trial&error lately on how to get the Commander X16 into graphics mode and displaying sprites. Currently, my code is this and it outputs this. I use the ACME Cross Compiler if thats any special. I have tried to find it out myself by looking at the documentation but i haven't been able to make it work. I have also tried looking at the source code of other games but most of the games with sprites are made in BASIC (I want to make it in Assembly) or aren't open source. I have also searched online and searched on this forum but could not find anything regarding displaying sprites in assembly
  17. Version 1.0.0

    41 downloads

    This simple BASIC program draws three graphics examples by using the LINE command. It runs on Commander X16 R37 and R38. This examples runs formerly on a Commodore C64 with a little help of a machine language program to draw the lines, sets graphics mode etc.
  18. Simple graphics demo in basic View File This simple BASIC program draws three graphics examples by using the LINE command. It runs on Commander X16 R37 and R38. This examples runs formerly on a Commodore C64 with a little help of a machine language program to draw the lines, sets graphics mode etc. Submitter canada2002 Submitted 12/17/20 Category Demos  
  19. Hi all, I started developing a game for the X16 last September - coming up on a year ago now! I come from same the 1980s 8-bit BASIC programming vintage as Director-in-Chief Murray and probably most of you lot too, but I've never developed a whole game before. The X16 project has inspired me to learn assembly, with the goal of writing this game. More than a whiff of nostalgia about it all too - fond memories of passing POKEs to schoolmates to get infinite lives in Manic Miner and Jet Set Willy. Loosely, my game is a turn-based strategy/resource management thing with a passing resemblance to the hex-based board game settlers of catan. But the resemblance is only skin deep - this game has a strong story-based adventuring/survival/exploration leaning, all mixed together and served up with a hearty dose of good old fashioned text adventure. Blimey, I'll tell you what - it's been a steep curve. Simultaneously learning assembly; learning the vera / X16 hardware whilst developing how the game is going to work: combat systems - resource / asset / fatigue management - display; writing the code ; creating the graphics; writing the prose. It turns out taking on a game (even an 8-bit style game) single-handedly is a HUGE undertaking. I doff my hat to @SlithyMatt - you sir are a legend I've no idea how you churn out the code with such amazing regularity!! But the great thing about the X16 is - IT CAN BE DONE. It might take ages, but if I can do it, anyone can! It's been a long time coming, but I've got to the stage now where I've finalised the gameplay, memory management, and the overarching story of the game. I've also battered my head against my assembly inadequacies sufficiently (with lots of help from proper programmers - again, hat tip to @SlithyMatt , @StephenHorn, @Greg King , @togster510 and others - sorry if I've missed you out!) such that the code for the main game loop is now (pretty much!) in place. Things I've learned so far: 1. Planning everything out on paper before starting to code ABSOLUTELY VITAL! I was keen to get into the 'interesting stuff' straight away (drawing the graphics, putting things on screen) but in the long run, having the whole game pretty much drawn out in principle on paper first meant I've avoided a number of unpleasantries in the coding thereof. How are you going to address the screen - one layer? two layers? What is going onto each layer? How many bpp will you need for each layer? How many sprites will you need? How many frames of animation? How much vram will all that take? How are you going to encode the various aspects of gameplay? Which memory banks are you going to put them in? Which leads me onto - 2. Plan out your memory management. The X16 only has 40k of low memory + 64 x 8k memory banks to play with (in the base model) plus 128kB of video memory, so you can't just splurge on huge 256 colour graphics all over the place - the limitations of the system require some thought on how much you're going to fit in, and how you're going to fit it in. I've used up three memory banks just storing the hex tiles for the whole game board (64 x 64 hexes in total, although not all visible on screen at once) - made up of 32 different types of hex terrain, each with its own individual replenishing resources, roads, rivers and bridges. 3. Assembly is HARD but not IMPOSSIBLE. I've lost count the number of times my eyes have glazed over whilst looking at what I've lda'd and what I've sta'd wondering why the hell it doesn't do what I've CLEARLY just told it to do... persevere, and post questions on the software support forum. There are kind people out there who will help you (me included, if it's within my power to do so!!) 4. You will probably end up writing programs that help you write your program. This one was a bit of a surprise for me - but I've done it twice so far already. For example, I wrote a bitmap converter that loads up 16x16 pixel .bmp graphic files I've drawn in photoshop, and it spews them into memory as four sequential 8x8 tiles for storing in the vram tile map (my graphics are 16x16 but they need to be placed on an 8x8 tile grid because of how the hexes work). It took me an afternoon to write but it would have been immensely complicated and taken a LOT longer to hand-convert every terrain and item graphic in a hex-editor! 5. Things change. Roll with the punches. If the gameplay has to change slightly to fit within the limitations, so be it. The people playing the finished game aren't bothered about what you thought the game was going to be like. Deciding on the layout of the main screen was a hassle for me - there's more stuff I wanted to show than there was room for, and I tried various ways of cramming it all in, whilst still getting it to look attractive. Eventually I decided I couldn't do it, so I've split the information across two screens that can be toggled between. The main screen now shows a bar that fills up as the amount of stuff you're carrying increases. A handful of grain fills up one backpack 'slot'; an apple fills up 3, and one load of stone fills 16 slots etc. so you have to be careful about choosing what to carry around with you. But you can toggle to the backpack screen that itemises all the resources and equipment you're carrying so you know for example how many apples you've got and how much stone you're carrying etc. I should add this game is a bit of a nod towards the now legendary Planet X2 - if you've got half an hour spare, David's 'making of' video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NB_VBl7ut9Y is really helpful and has some great tips particularly about memory management - it's aimed specifically at the C64, but a lot of it is pertinent to the X16 too. I hope this is of some help for others considering embarking on a similar coding journey. At the very least, I'm writing all this down now in the hope that you lovely X16 people will hold me to account and spur me on to actually finish writing this blasted game..! The hexes await... in the meantime, have a peek at the notes in the photos below, it'll give you a flavour of what kind of things are included in the game. Also a screenshot of how the game currently looks. Ta ta for now!
  20. So in my other post here: I wanted to make a programming language and a IDE to be used in the X16. So for creating the text box I have 2 options: 1. Using the GNU Readline library pros: Allows me to program in c cons: May not work on the X16, Lack of documentation, Might need to be ported to the X16 2. Directly editing the video memory pros: Gives me full control over graphics, Wont require extra code to be ported, cons: Even though I do have experience in assembly(x86 and 6502) it will be very hard to get right. So I have chosen to interface with the video memory directly. I'm having a bit of trouble understanding the Vera video card. I have read through parts of the unofficial documentation but I have a couple questions: 1. How do you switch to text mode? 2. How do you add characters or etc to specific parts of the screen? As development continues more questions may arise if so they will be added on to the list of questions. Thank you and have a nice day!
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