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Travis Bryant moore

Software for the CX16 suggestions?

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What would you like to see running on the CX16. I would like to see a 256 color simcity or Simcity 2000 on the machine. I know the SNES had a lot of games. And that sc2k was on it. Will anyone try porting snes games to the cx 16 like top gear?

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Posted (edited)

New Games.

Totally doable and possibly interesting:

  • Corewars
  • 4X games
  • Multi-player "business simulations" (supply and demand yields interesting interactions...)
  • City-simulations, colony simulations, etc.
  • Starflight-like variants
  • Fantasy RPG themed games (fighter, magic user, cleric, thief....)
  • Exploration games (Seven Cities of Gold, or even Space Hulk!)
  • Pirates!-like variants (combine it with Seven Cities and you may have something very interesting...)
  • Post Apocalyptic survival games (e.g. Fallout Shelter; Wasteland)

And also, arcade-style games.

 

Edited by rje
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Posted (edited)

Space Derelict for the Commander X16

I'm thinking of a 2D, top-down space derelict game, but based on Traveller instead of WH40K's "Space Hulk".

Your inspection cutter finds a derelict hull, matches course heading, links to it via cable.  Your battledressed marine squad deploys, attaches a portable airlock, cuts their way in.  You order their entry and march sequence, advancing them through the hull, cleaning out rebel scum, xenomorphs, and hostile aliens.

At a higher challenge level, your free trader finds the derelict, and your ragtag crew have to clean it out to claim salvage rights.

 

Edited by rje
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Posted (edited)

I liked Starflight's controls.  Stardock resembled the town center in MULE, and the docks in "Spain" for Seven Cities.  You had only a few places to go, but you actually "walked" there.  That is a nice way to anthropomorphize a menu.

 

Edited by rje
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Posted (edited)

SNES ports may need this? I think most snes or dos games were in some version in C or something like that. I guess if you had access to sd cards you could run C like programs or can Basic do all that. But which is more details Basic or C for a game. Or do you need some C compiler to run an SNES game or SNES emulator?

Edited by Travis Bryant moore

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Posted (edited)

So, that video is about doing C coding on your modern machine, and cross-compiling to the X16.  cc65 is one of the tools that lets you write your own C code and compile it to run on the X16.

Porting a game would require having the source code and being able to compile it specifically to the X16 as a compile target.

 

 

Edited by rje
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So is there a file conversion for roms to be changed over or would that have to be made and done on a PC to be ported over the cx16? I only mentioned this when I saw the vlc player convert video to ASCII code movies. But I guess Roms are not original code. And what you mentioned would be editing the code line by line?

1 hour ago, rje said:

So, that video is about doing C coding on your modern machine, and cross-compiling to the X16.  cc65 is one of the tools that lets you write your own C code and compile it to run on the X16.

Porting a game would require having the source code and being able to compile it specifically to the X16 as a compile target.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Travis Bryant moore said:

So is there a file conversion for roms to be changed over or would that have to be made and done on a PC to be ported over the cx16?

Video game ROMs contain machine code designed for a specific processor architecture. For example, an IBM PC (x86) program will not run on the Commander X16 (65C02). Furthermore, even if two systems have compatible processors, the code will often rely on specific hardware being addressable at specific locations. For example, a C64 game will expect the VIC-II registers to begin at $D000. Therefore, porting a game to the Commander X16 would likely involve rewriting the game from scratch.

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Posted (edited)

SNES games were written in assembler, by and large. Certainly they were at Nintendo, which we all know after the Gigaleak happened. I've read the source of Zelda LttP - very cool stuff.

Edited by ZeroByte
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There is an impressive (but limited) version of SimCity for the Arduboy, which IMO is a terrible handheld that didn't have the planning and vision of the X16.  2.5KB RAM, and I think game files are limited to 22KB.    My point is that if it can be made for Arduboy, it can be made better than the original for X16.

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1 hour ago, Guy.Brush said:

There is an impressive (but limited) version of SimCity for the Arduboy, which IMO is a terrible handheld that didn't have the planning and vision of the X16.  2.5KB RAM, and I think game files are limited to 22KB.    My point is that if it can be made for Arduboy, it can be made better than the original for X16.

Your name reminds me - Monkey Island would face the same challenge as Wolfenstein- the cx16 doesn't have resizeable sprites.

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11 hours ago, Ed Minchau said:

Your name reminds me - Monkey Island would face the same challenge as Wolfenstein- the cx16 doesn't have resizeable sprites.

Yes, but shrinking an already low-resolution sprite never looked that good anyway - Guybrush's eye is just 1 black pixel at full size, so the small version is basically Pitfall Harry.  Except Pitfall Harry looked better, because he was designed to look the best he could at that size.

Since resizing these sprites smaller just strips all the detail off of them, it's possibly more efficient to design different sized sprites in the first place and swap them out.  The end result is about the same - less detailed images being displayed - but you've done the work beforehand rather than asking the program to do it constantly.  

So the size transitions would be less fluid, but potentially better-looking at each size.  Or if you'd rather stay truer to the original, you could pre-render the scaling; import the exact resized images from Monkey Island, and make them your sprites for X16.

Or, since Monkey Island's environments are static backgrounds, you could zoom in.  Instead of watching Guybrush approach from a distant path and get bigger while while the screen stays still, he could stay the same size while the camera pans out with him, the screen gradually displaying more of the background until it's full size.  That would probably be a terrible compromise, but watching Guybrush approach and get bigger usually acts only as a cutscene effect, so it wouldn't change the gameplay.

Of course DOOM is a much different situation than Monkey Island, and without resizing it will probably be obvious that the enemies are just getting bigger rather than coming closer.  But you could design the AI so that they tend to move laterally instead of straight towards you; have them go around corners or hide behind something while you approach, or generally try to design the levels so that enemies are either far away or close up.  That's a tall order for level design, but trickier tricks have been done.  

And DOOM graphics were always something to get used to anyway; those med packs rotating and staring at you, because they're actually 2D and the only thing not rotating.  So if you come up with something that works, people will accept it as natural if it's a good game.  For example, the enemy sprite animations could help obscure the resizing by briefly turning sideways or crouching slightly every time the sprite is swapped for a bigger one.  At the moment when the sprite becomes bigger, it's doing something that makes it look slightly smaller.

But even if you made the enemy sprites change size seamlessly in DOOM, you still need the wall textures and everything else in the room to get bigger as you approach.  So something like Wolfenstein is probably a more achievable goal. 

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