Jump to content

DIY Electronics, Tools, and other Projects.


Strider
 Share

Recommended Posts

As you all know, I have been doing a lot with Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and a lot with electronics in general. Now I am putting together my own tools like a bench power supply using an old computer PSU, building my own buck converters, and now I want to do my own basic oscilloscope. I don't want or need anything fancy or expensive, but I also didn't want one of those cheap handheld kits you see all over Amazon. So... I just broke down and picked up an EspoTek Labrador and everything I need to put together a DIY scope, as least as close as I can realistically get. I am also curious how good it will work for it's $29 price.

So I got the unit itself, a project enclosure, BNC connectors, and probes. I have everything else I may need already. I will run the software on my Pi 4 since I use that for most of my electronic work anyway. We will see how it all goes when the parts arrive and I'll post my results.

That being said, after talking about buck converters with @TomXP411 in a different thread, I wanted a thread to talk about DIY things that don't necessarily fall completely under other specific categories.

So what kind of "things" do you DIY, or would like to do, and why? Or do you just prefer to buy what you need like a sane person? Or maybe buying kits is as far as you want to do DIY?

I have a feeling with all the retro tinkerers here, there is a lot of DIY being done. 🙂 

 

Edited by Strider
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Super Administrators

Those buck/boost regulators are pretty nice. I'm using one to power my MiSTer now, and I'll probably get more to support my Minimig (coming Saturday) and my MINI PET. 

That oscilloscope looks interesting for sampling audio and low-speed data connections. At 750KSPS, it isn't going to be able to check the clock on a Commodore 64, but it will work for testing I2C and serial connections... That logic analyzer function looks especially useful. 

So here are some things I'd look at, especially if I'm on a budget:

Test equipment: 

  • Hantek Computer Oscilloscope - This is a digital oscilloscope and logic analyzer. Useful for probing chips, oscillators (including clock circuits) and testing data busses. 
  • Sigilent Oscilloscope : I have one of these. I love it. It's been very handy in checking out chips and signals on communication busses
  • Logic Probe: a good logic probe can be had for less than $30, and they will tell if a line is high, low, or changing. This can be very useful when doing a quick diagnosis of a chip to see if it's putting out any sort of signal. You can see an example here on T8BG's 128 repair video. 

Power supplies: I have several. A good 12v supply is really useful, as it not only lets you use auto equipment in your house, but I run a bunch of ham radio gear from my Wescom RS-35A. (That's a collector's item now...I got a good deal on it from a fellow ham.) Look for a good price on a linear regulated power supply, as switching supplies can add a lot of noise to the output. Used is fine, and you can find good deals at swap meets and EBay. 

Here's a Pyramid 6-amp linear power supply that should be good for most projects that need 12v or less. 

  • On that note, these little variable regulators are super handy. Pair that with the 12v power supply, and you can power any retro project.
  • Here's another variable regulator with a full enclosure.
  • This is a nice lab bench supply. What's unique about this one is the output enable switch. This lets you set the voltage before connecting the power supply to the circuit, something that most of the variable supplies don't do. 

A good soldering iron is also a must... 

  • This has everything you need. I prefer to use a sponge to clean my tips, and the utility of the helping hands should be obvious. I also love the thermostatic control. The iron will heat up in seconds, and you can maintain any temperature you set. 
  • I just got this one... and I'm bummed it didn't come with a sponge tray. Other than that, I really like it, and I'd happily get it again. I just have to go get a small soap dish or something for the sponge. 

Other stuff I keep on hand: 

  • Breadboards
  • Arduino Uno, Arduino Due, Teensy 3.5 microcontrollers
  • Raspberry Pi (400, 3B, 3B+, 4B, Pi Zero)
  • Multimeter: I like this Klien, although Fluke is the name to beat. My brother found this set at a yard sale for $10. The guy selling it had no idea what he had.
  • I also love this little USB power tester. It's interesting to see what your USB devices are actually doing, and I can also use it to make sure my power supply is feeding enough power to my Pi, MiSTer, or other SBC. 

I've also noticed quite a few "DIY" versions of all those tools on Amazon... looking for stuff to solder tonight, I saw multimeters, power supplies, and even calculators. Just do a search for "DIY electronics kit" and see what comes up. 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Oh yeah, there are a lot of "DIY Electronic Kits" on Amazon, and other sites as well if you drop that same search in Google. I have bought a few, just little fun kits to build for others, like a colorful LED heart for my wife (that I posted here with some other stuff), a star one for my daughter, and an "RGB" clock for the heck of it. All very simple but fun kits. Though I did make a handheld game one for me.  I haven't tried any of the kits for tools though, since I either have them or can just do it myself. My primary reason is for fun. I enjoy it, and it will be useful to me. It's how I relax on my time off. 

@TomXP411My DIY bench PSU will include this regulator, like the one you have (I bought it after you mentioned it in the other thread), minus the barrel jack since it will be powered by the Corsair 450W SFX PSU that will be in my bench. It's been sitting in my closet for a long time, so I figured I would put it to use. It was an item sent to me for review, and that I have not needed since. 

I picked up a new soldering iron a few months ago as well, and so far it's working great. I also got a spare iron with it, and a set of tips. What's funny is I never knew what I was missing having flux under my brass wool until I got this station and it came with it that way. I kinda want to try the Pinecil and see how well it works one of these days.

As far as my other tools, this is what I currently use.

I am looking at a rework hot air gun, maybe this one. Not sure yet, for SMD work.

Of course, I have my breadboard, PCBs, and a lot of components all over the place. lol

Edited by Strider
Add forgotten link
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great stuff. 

When browsing Amazon, its worth using smile.amazon.xx so Amazon give a fraction to a charity for every purchase! Even if you use smile.amazon.xxx a link to www.amazon.com won't auto forward without an extension ( I use https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/smile-always/jgpmhnmjbhgkhpbgelalfpplebgfjmbf )

Unless you have some sort of referral, it's worth updating the links..?

More info: https://smile.amazon.com/charity/smile/about

Edited by Yazwho
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
On 1/7/2022 at 12:22 PM, Yazwho said:

Great stuff. 

When browsing Amazon, its worth using smile.amazon.xx so Amazon give a fraction to a charity for every purchase! Even if you use smile.amazon.xxx a link to www.amazon.com won't auto forward without an extension ( I use https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/smile-always/jgpmhnmjbhgkhpbgelalfpplebgfjmbf )

Unless you have some sort of referral, it's worth updating the links..?

I do use Smile, when I remember, buying my own items. But when posting links, it's often just to show the item, I'm not posting it trying to push it for sale. 😁

 

Edited by Strider
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrators

I agree soldering iron should be good, but I also use these cheap models.

BT-8U is very lighweight and compact. Can be powered from 5V phone supply or powerbank, drains about 1A. Heats up very fast, in about 20 seconds. You can solder PCB with it, but desoldering is not an option due to very low power. Very conveninent to use in places with no power outlet and to solder something very fast. I use it for small and quick repairs. Usually it's childern toys reapir. Also I put it in my pocket, when I go somehere, where soldering might happen to be needed.

SH72 needs at least 12V, which is ideal to use in car, powering it from standard car outlet. Can accept up to 24V to output more power. Also very compact. Heats up fast, in about 1 minute. Has many replacable tips for different tasks. Ideal to solder PCB. Desoldering usualy works ok, but not always, again due to low power. This iron is my daily driver for most of my needs.

I also have powerful and bulky soldering iron with slow heat up time, but I use it only when my little guys can't do the job.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I really do want to try one of those portable irons, and with the generally good reviews I have seen the Pinecil get, that's the next iron on my list. Powering it off a quality portable battery bank is an attractive idea to me.

I currently use a butane one for my portable and  automotive needs. I like it, but it stays in my cars toolbox. 

This one: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07M9ZKK9T (Got it on sale for $25).

@Cyber I have been looking at getting one of those fixed rotating PCB holders, in addition to the "helping hands" one I have already that uses alligator clips, I just haven't needed one yet. They would be handy for kit builds and such I think. Do you like yours? I have never used one like that, but they look like they would be a bit "easier"than bending helping hands around.

Edited by Strider
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrators
On 1/8/2022 at 10:38 AM, Strider said:

@Cyber I have been looking at getting one of those fixed rotating PCB holders, in addition to the "helping hands" one I have already that uses alligator clips, I just haven't needed one yet. They would be handy for kit builds and such I think. Do you like yours? I have never used one like that, but they look like they would be a bit "easier"than bending helping hands around.

Yes, I like mine! Very conveneint that PCB can easily be rotated during soldering process. It also can be quickly fixed at any angle. Much easier than bending helping hands.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
On 1/9/2022 at 10:35 AM, Cyber said:

Yes, I like mine! Very conveneint that PCB can easily be rotated during soldering process. It also can be quickly fixed at any angle. Much easier than bending helping hands.

Well, I broke down and ordered one. This one to be exact. They mostly all seem to be the same design and work the same, so we will see.

Parts are starting to arrive! Got my probes today, and the enclosure the Labrador is going in. The unit itself should be here Monday (tomorrow), as well as the buck converter I ordered for my bench PSU. I have Tuesday off so I will be testing them both out then.

Sadly the BNC connectors I ordered are going to be late. I just hope they are here by next weekend, that's when I had planned on putting it all together.

Though, my L7805CV voltage regulators and their heatsinks showed up today too. Need them for a couple other projects.

parts1.jpg.d0d9717d8449b1713e6b1e3102e5f986.jpgparts1-2.jpg.b7f33f171d2c50637df3cbb1b014d8ce.jpgparts2.jpg.1b2e61517114ad099edc8b4a6c7b4a7a.jpg

Edited by Strider
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/9/2022 at 11:07 PM, TomXP411 said:

I found out today that @Perifractic has a page where he posts his favorite tools! 

https://www.perifractic.com/takeout-shop/

These are the things he personally uses, rather than just shilling whatever he's getting paid to talk about. (I'm looking at you, Linus Sebastian.)

We use the same Thermotronics tip tinner and Easycargo heatsinks I see. haha

What's funny, as if the timing could not be any better, I was literally looking at them just a few hours ago, I am in the market for a good electric screwdriver for light duty and there is one on the list!

@Perifractic, if you don't mind, do you still use that ORIA Electric Screwdriver and what do you think of it? I just want one for PC and small project work, and the pen design is something I would also probably like.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Super Administrators
On 1/9/2022 at 9:34 PM, Strider said:

We use the same Thermotronics tip tinner and Easycargo heatsinks I see. haha

What's funny, as if the timing could not be any better, I was literally looking at them just a few hours ago, I am in the market for a good electric screwdriver for light duty and there is one on the list!

@Perifractic, if you don't mind, do you still use that ORIA Electric Screwdriver and what do you think of it? I just want one for PC and small project work, and the pen design is something I would also probably like.

I actually only got it recently. I like it a lot! It’s shown in my next video on Saturday (Tom has early access now hehe). It doesn’t have immense torque but it’s great for smaller items which is the point really anyway. Also for things that need care like putting breadbin C64 case screws back in. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/9/2022 at 11:42 PM, Perifractic said:

I actually only got it recently. I like it a lot! It’s shown in my next video on Saturday (Tom has early access now hehe). It doesn’t have immense torque but it’s great for smaller items which is the point really anyway. Also for things that need care like putting breadbin C64 case screws back in. 

Excellent, I will check that out!

I use a Skil 4.8V "Twist", it's several years old now and not well suited for "precision" work.

skiltwist.jpg.74cd83831b17225ee245a7aca883d70c.jpg

So I want something newer and better for use on project boxes, electronics, enclosures, and other such light work. Plus, $27 seems very reasonable. 😁

Thanks for the info!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

@TomXP411 Did you find a way to calibrate the output reading on your buck converter? Adjusting the input calibration is easy enough, but doing so throws off the output reading. Using a 9V source, it's off by about 0.20V, and using a 12V source, that discrepancy drops a lot, to just 0.07V. All with it adjusting to output 5V.

I tried 3 sources, 2  were fully charged good batteries. They were a standard new 9V and an APC 12V UPS backup battery (I have a couple of these lying around for the UPS units I use, all are new). The last was the PC PSU's 12V output. The readings were the same. All verified using 2 multimeters I know to be accurate. I did the 9V battery just to make sure the unit was working before digging everything else out (I know the lower the input voltage, the less accurate it can be. ), but I ended up digging it all out anyway. lol

The converter itself is working perfectly, it's just the output reading that's off. I am just nitpicking, since it will always be on the 12V PSU output. I can live with a 0.07 discrepancy just fine. 😁

I may just adjust the input reading to get the output where I want it. I really don't care if the input reading is off, since the input source will always be of a known voltage. The output reading is all I care about. I just figured I would ask first, just in case you stumbled across something I missed.

buck-measure9v.jpg.d2852da9965d9de4bbcdf58eba930ccd.jpg

buck-measure12v.jpg.1f5662137d3d3336e47a6b38176991b6.jpg

 

Edited by Strider
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Super Administrators

That's interesting. Did you have a load on the unit when you tested it? I've found that most regulators will show a high voltage on a DVM with no load. 

More to the point, I only use the output voltage on the regulator as a general guideline. What I'm actually interested in is how what the voltage is on my device: in this case, a MiSTer. So I actually testing the voltage on the MiSTer itself by reading one of the GPIO pins. Later, once I put the I/O board back on, I was able to read the voltage from the SNAC port or from one of the USB hub ports. I ended up adjusting the regulator a bit high, so that the USB voltage was as close to exactly 5.0v as possible. 

Still, I find it interesting that the voltage reads differently on the regulator based on the input voltage. I'll have to check that behavior on mine. 

... and the answer is: My meter is spot on. So maybe there is some tolerance stacking on yours. Yours is a slightly different design than mine, so maybe there's an issue with that specific board. 

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/12/2022 at 11:00 AM, TomXP411 said:

That's interesting. Did you have a load on the unit when you tested it? I've found that most regulators will show a high voltage on a DVM with no load. 

More to the point, I only use the output voltage on the regulator as a general guideline. What I'm actually interested in is how what the voltage is on my device: in this case, a MiSTer. So I actually testing the voltage on the MiSTer itself by reading one of the GPIO pins. Later, once I put the I/O board back on, I was able to read the voltage from the SNAC port or from one of the USB hub ports. I ended up adjusting the regulator a bit high, so that the USB voltage was as close to exactly 5.0v as possible. 

Still, I find it interesting that the voltage reads differently on the regulator based on the input voltage. I'll have to check that behavior on mine. 

... and the answer is: My meter is spot on. So maybe there is some tolerance stacking on yours. Yours is a slightly different design than mine, so maybe there's an issue with that specific board.

I forgot to mention, yes, I ran it under load just to see, used a 330ohm resistor with an LED. The results were identical.

I am also much more interested in the actual output voltage, and that works great, so the converter is working perfectly. The reading I get on the converter itself is just a matter of convenience. I still use my meter to verify before use.

I did reach out to the seller and I am just waiting to hear back. I will update this when I hear from them. 🙂

It may indeed just be an issue with this specific unit, or design, either way it still works and I am not all that fussed about a 0.07V discrepancy at 12V, what it will be running at 100% of the time. Nothing I am doing with it will be sensitive to such a small variance. Like I said, I am just curious as to why it's happening.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@TomXP411 I think I know why it's happening...

I went in and adjusted the input reading down to fix the output reading, and it worked, and it was then I realized what may be going on.

The battery I was using for testing is a 12V 9Ah SLA, the type used in UPS units, it's actual output is 12.56V at full charge. So that's where I set the buck converter becasue that's where I tested it at. I neglected to check the battery again once I had it hooked up to the converter, and under the load of the converter. This time I did just that, and the battery output drops down to about 12.44V. Low and behold , right where I just set the input reading, and of course I get the proper output reading.

So I hooked the converter up to the PSU I will be using, and it's spot on. The PSU output does not drop off when under load, at least not the loads I am going to be putting it under, not like a battery. So it's working as it should, it was my fault to begin with. I was only reading the output and not accounting for the fact the battery drops off when under load.

Mystery solved.

Guess I should message the seller back and let them know I figured it out. It amazing the silly things one overlooks when they are rushing. Glad I have the next 3 days off to work on these projects. 😛

Edited by Strider
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Super Administrators
On 1/15/2022 at 6:33 PM, Strider said:

@TomXP411 I think I know why it's happening...

I went in and adjusted the input reading down to fix the output reading, and it worked, and it was then I realized what may be going on.

The battery I was using for testing is a 12V 9Ah SLA, the type used in UPS units, it's actual output is 12.56V at full charge. So that's where I set the buck converter becasue that's where I tested it at. I neglected to check the battery again once I had it hooked up to the converter, and under the load of the converter. This time I did just that, and the battery output drops down to about 12.44V. Low and behold , right where I just set the input reading, and of course I get the proper output reading.

So I hooked the converter up to the PSU I will be using, and it's spot on. The PSU output does not drop off when under load, at least not the loads I am going to be putting it under, not like a battery. So it's working as it should, it was my fault to begin with. I was only reading the output and not accounting for the fact the battery drops off when under load.

Mystery solved.

Guess I should message the seller back and let them know I figured it out. It amazing the silly things one overlooks when they are rushing. Glad I have the next 3 days off to work on these projects. 😛

It's often something simple like that, isn't it?   🙂

 

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That it is... lol

Now I need to build an Arduino based signal generator so I can test out the Espotek Labrador, becasue, I don't own one. I should have everything I need here, and why not, what's one more small project.

I verified it's working just a bit ago by using an Arduino to output a varying PWM signal, ramping up and back down between 0V and 5V, and it works. So far, I guess. There is very little documentation on it so I am muddling my way through it, thankfully it's a really simple device to hookup and use. It has a few different functions and each use it's own pins, so I will end up having to test all of it, hopefully tomorrow.

labtest1.thumb.jpg.2cc37cae074b658ddaefc3b011f10018.jpg

 

EDIT: I forgot, it's got a built in generator. 😛

So I mimicked a simple test circuit from their highly limited wiki page,  and was able to get readings that appear to be consistent. The only issue I have now is getting it fully calibrated. It's readings are ground referenced, and when I ground out the scope pins at the end of calibration, it fails saying it's expecting to see close to 0V, makes sense, that.s grounds to the USB ground, and it still fails to complete calibration. So I need to try a different ground, see if that makes a difference. Still, it's coming along, and it's fun to play with!

labtest2-1.jpg.4c51398f6ed72bfc3856b53ee5b315b3.jpglabtest2-2.jpg.228325777b755367b43522254ffd0143.jpg

Edited by Strider
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Well, it's finally in an enclosure. It's not the prettiest, I'll rework it in the future, but it works! 😛

I have it wired up for the 2 channel scope, 2 channel logic analyzer, and the signal generator, don't need the other functions.

I ran into an issue with it not wanting to calibrate, so I reached out to the boards developer, and after some back and forth he figured out it was a software issue that was overwhelming the Pi's CPU. A couple days later he released a fix, I updated the package, and now it's working like a charm. For the cheap "tool" that it is, it seems to work well. It will never replace the real tools it's emulating, but for $29 I have found it useful for my simple circuits.

lab-done2.jpg.49e33898dc5197b1fff14b3a861dec18.jpglab-done1.jpg.090cfcc8c78f1ec8be3f8a480cdf32df.jpg

Edited by Strider
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

😩 Global chip shortage SUCKS. 🤨

It really does affect just about everything...

So, I'm trying to move away from Arduino units for the final versions of my projects, and just use the ATMega328 or Tiny85 itself, along with my own support circuitry. Sadly, the Mega328 is nearly impossible to find, I can't find one in stock from any seller I trust. There are some Tiny85's, and I did order some, but they are drying up fast and overpriced, costing as much as a Mega328.

I found some Mega328's on Sparkfun, a name I know but have yet to buy from, and they had 31 in stock @ $2.95 each. Was going to order 10. At checkout they wanted to charge $14 shipping, seemed like a lot for 10 small microchips. So I dropped it to 5 chips, still $14 shipping. Bumped it up to 20, still $14 shipping. These things cost pennies to ship, so it seemed off. So I fired off an email to them asking if the quote was correct, and figured I would run it past my wife about getting 20 if the shipping stays the same. Then I would have plenty to use for quite some time. By the time I got back home (I was at work), they were sold out. So, back to square one. Unless I want to buy them at hugely inflated prices from Amazon scalpers, and I don't, so I am out of luck for now I guess. My bad for questioning shipping. lol

I did manage to pick up some Tiny85's (x10), and some SN74HC595N 8-Bit counter shift registers to extend the output capabilities of the Tiny85, and that will work for some things, but the Mega328 is what I really need. I guess for now I'll stick to using the several Arduino Nano units I have lying about.

While doing all my shopping around, I picked up some NE555P timers, some DIP IC sockets, a programming shield for the Arduino UNO (for when I do get my hands on some Mega328s), and a Tiny AVR Programmer for the Tiny85s, just to keep things simple. Along with various other stuff. So not a total loss. Though I ended up paying more for the Tiny85's than I wanted, at $2 each and $10 shipping, still, they were one of the cheapest I could find in stock. Packs of 5 are going for $19 on Amazon, so it's still cheaper than going that route.

I just can't wait for this stupid chip shortage to end! 🙄

 

Edit: Well, after a TON of searching, I broke down and ordered 4 Mega328P-PU chips off eBay for just over $5 each, so about double their per-shortage price. It was the best price I could find, the only ones I could find honestly.

Got them from a US seller with good feedback, so we will see if they're any good. They're supposed to be preloaded with the Uno bootloader, so that saves me a step, maybe. It should hold me over.

Most licensed sellers say they wont have stock until February or March 2023, a few say June 2022. Whenever it ends up happening, I'm going to order about 20 of them. lol

Edited by Strider
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I got bored ... and decided I wanted to make a simple, no fuss, continuity tester. You know, for those times you don't want to mess around with your multimeter? Just a single simple tool to do a simple easy job.

OK... I wanted to test out the AVR programmer, get some practice working with these chips, and practice making labels before my wife and I invest in some new toys. So I picked something simple and that I would actually, maybe, get some use out of.

What I ended up with was a Tiny85 powered tester that simply plays a tone when continuity is detected. It has simple toggle power switch becasue I'm old and like toggles! Though not really necessary, becasue it will go to sleep after 60 seconds of inactivity anyway. Using a 3V button-cell, it has a sense voltage of 5mV, so I'm happy with it.

cont-tester-1.thumb.jpg.c48a15c077ade0e328633dbf8f49a1f5.jpg

 

The toys I'm talking about are an Ender 3 3D Printer and Cricut machine for doing custom vinyl cuts (not sure what one we're getting yet).

I want both for making small custom enclosures, parts, and labels. My wife wants them for the custom jewelry she's making along with some of the resin projects she's working on. So a win-win. lol

It's good to have hobbies. 😆

Oh, and if I needed more stuff.... Decided to pick up a 5-pack of Digisparks. 😛

ds3.jpg.fdebc21afebb911a3aeb4642b6a18090.jpg

Edited by Strider
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I "upgraded", just ... becasue. Hantek 6022BE.

Openhantek running on Win 10 and Ubuntu on the Atomic Pi. It actually runs better on Ubuntu and the AP than my Windows desktop. 😛

Now to get it up and running on the Pi 4. I love the wide ranging support. Still a cheap scope, but I've been looking at it a long time, but it was Adrian's videos that finally pushed me to pull the trigger. For $65, I'm happy, and so it my wallet. I have the Labrador to play with and the Hantek to actually use for my simple projects and vintage troubleshooting.

hantek-unit.jpg.1f8d4835e7fd6e9fb19a7bc2eff00754.jpg

hantek-calibrate.thumb.jpg.c300a2c520bb02b4e367af964717e169.jpg

hantek-ubuntu-atomicpi.thumb.jpg.26d098994e52f897d15c2a31b61b184f.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's actually really neat. I didn't know they made scopes that connected to a computer for their interface/screen. Whoah... it's been 30 years since I used an oscilloscope! Teehee... I once tried convince my wife to go on a 14 or so hour drive to buy this super cool looking old scope that still worked, "just because". Let me see if I can find a picture...

 spacer.png

Something like that. Definitely less practical than your garden variety square screened scope or the nifty tool you have, but it sure would look great on one's desk! 😄

... There's something to be said about having real knobs and buttons to use... Life itself is a tactile experience and I think we really miss out on some of that in today's tech world; if you're not tinkering with circuit stuff, you're generally just tapping a smooth screen, clacking a keyboard, and swooshing a mouse. Console style gamepads and desktop keyboards are still full tactile experiences, but they lack the visual aspect of tuning a system by turning knobs and flicking switches while watching dials and screens... That old tech from the 50s-70s was really built for people to touch and feel, to connect with in a practical manner.

I keep a rotary phone on my desk, "just because". It's not hooked up to anything. I just like it.

Edited by Tatwi
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Please review our Terms of Use