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is assembly language and monitor covered in the x16 manual?


Anshul2
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No. Assembly language is something you need to learn from other sources - like Jim Butterfields book for the C64 still one of the best books to read.

Here are some links (depending on the language you speak/read)

German:

https://www.retro-programming.de/programming/assembler/

English:

https://skilldrick.github.io/easy6502/

Here is Jim Butterfields book...

http://www.1000bit.it/support/manuali/commodore/c64/ML_for_the_C64_and_Other_Commodore_Computers.pdf

Also a good thing to understand the C64 book. It is actually everything that is referenced from the X16 dokumentation (e.g. BASIC, KERNAL calls etc.)

http://www.zimmers.net/anonftp/pub/cbm/c64/manuals/C64_Programmers_Reference_Guide.pdf

And this documentation to understand all the different inner workings of the Commodores ... very extensive and also quick reference.

https://archive.org/details/Complete_Commodore_Inner_Space_Anthology_The_1985-03_Transactor_Publishing

The Monitor is covered in this document:

https://github.com/commanderx16/x16-docs/blob/master/Commander X16 Programmer's Reference Guide.md#machine-language-monitor

Edited by SerErris
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4 hours ago, SerErris said:

Thanks for that!  While I wrote a lot of 6502 "back in the day," my work was almost exclusively on the Apple ][ series. As such, the books I have are all centered around those systems.  Having a good C64 reference will help with some things I want to fiddle with for the Commander X16!

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We are planning a separate guide for that, but for now just click Downloads above to be taken to the current documentation.

Will there be appendices listing tables of things like the Vera registers, or special memory locations as a quick reference?


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  • 5 months later...

Jim Butterfield is pretty amazing. I was reading The First Book of KIM and imagining what it would have been like for that to be my introduction to programming. He covers everything in a way that starts slow and builds naturally. His writing style is very conversational, almost like he is sitting there with you explaining what to do and why. I think that anyone with second grade reading skills would have no problem with it.

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